In case you were wondering about those big scoots..... | GTAMotorcycle.com

In case you were wondering about those big scoots.....

MacDoc

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Could not have said it better......a new Burgman 650 rider and a well thought out process to get there
and yes Virginia......it's the transmission ;)

I'm 38 years old and I have been riding motorcycles for 15 years with broken time - longer if I count mini bike and dirt bike experience as a kid on various platforms. In addition to that experience, I rode a Honda PA-50 moped in my early teen years (12-16).

As for my 15 years of licensed motorcycling, I have owned a Yamaha RD-250, Kawasaki KLR 250,Kawasaki KLR 650 and a Honda XR650L. I have ridden many different bikes, V-Max, Sportster, Shadow, Street Glide, CM-450, CBR 600, DR-650, and probably a few others I can't remember. I have been through rider courses and have also coached.

Most of my “real” experience is dirt and dual-sport. My passion is adventure motorcycling. I enjoy public dirt and gravel roads the most because I love to explore. I have what I like to call: “what’s down that road?-itis.” I love this style of riding so much; I am riding the Trans-America Trail in 2012 on my XR650L.

For years, I have searched for the holy grail of dual-sport - a bike that can truly go anywhere. As hard as I have tried, the thing dual sport bikes have failed at (for me) were 300+ mile days on pavement.
Slogging "slab miles" to get to all the good riding is TORTUOUS to me. Yup, after 300mi, I've had it with all the buzzing, buffeting, and the 2X4 seat. This is a personal factor, of course. Many heartier souls have completed Saddle Sore 1000 and even tougher rides on far "worse" platforms. It's just not my idea of fun.

Unfortunately for me, I now temporarily live in a megalopolis that requires many miles of urban riding in order to get where the riding becomes "good.” Dual sport tires don't hold up very well when you ride half street, half dirt/gravel. I put on a new rear tire about every 2500 miles with mixed surface riding. That is not only expensive, but frustrating - I do all my own work and my hands are tired of mounting heavy duty tubes and tires!

Although multi-surface motorcycling is my foremost passion, I have a very close second: a smooth ribbon of black asphalt twisting through the countryside.

Not surprisingly, dirt bikes are almost as much at home on twisty pavement as they are in the dirt. Light weight coupled with excellent steering geometry make dirt bikes a natural fit on curvy roads. I have out- ridden many a rider in the twisty mountain roads of North Carolina and elsewhere in Appalachia on my XR650L. It is exceedingly satisfying to embarrass a guy who has twice my engine and a big fat contact patch – and is obviously trying to keep up – while riding my one-cylinder, carbureted, air cooled dirt bike with knobby tires...

I know this is inflammatory to some, so I have 2 disclaimers to head off some arguments:

Disclaimer 1: I ride to 10% above the posted speed limit - and try to maintain that speed - not the advisory speed - through corners when safe. For example, if a road is marked 55mph, but there is a yellow 35mph advisory speed for the corner, I will try to go as fast as I can through the corner, up to 60mph as long as I can safely brake by my limit point of observation. I'm not a guy who is out to kill someone, so I'll save anything more aggressive than that for the track.

Disclaimer 2: I'm no dumb amateur. I fully realize that - at least in a straight line - there is no replacement for displacement. In addition, I also recognize that an experienced fella can accomplish a lot with a heavy bike in the corners. Just look up the videos of heavy touring bikes carving up Deals Gap on YouTube. My hats off to them - but, those riders are not the norm.

Even if I were to have equal motorcycling skill as some of those YouTube fellas, and I very well may, a lighter, more flickable bike that can also brake later before apex is much more fun – and can be faster!
For my money, I'd rather have my old KLR 250 back for twisty use before I would ever want to pilot near half a ton in the corners.

The problem with a 250, however, is that you have to get TO the twisties. So, you have to strike a balance. That is why I have a 650 dual-sport – to make getting TO the dirt/gravel somewhat bearable. It’s either that or a 250 with a trailer…

After a recent 1400 mile trip to NC with some friends on my XR650L (shoed with street-biased tires) I thought about getting a SuperMoto kit for my XR650L to make slab more bearable. Instead, I decided to give up the good fight and get a new bike - purely for slab touring use. I needed a bike I could ride out to the twisties in 300-500 mile days, have fun in the twisties, and then ride home – all in comfort. What kind of crazy bike is good at that?

When looking for my new bike, I had some personal preferences I had to keep in mind:

1. The cruiser position is comfortable for the long straights, but WEIRD in the corners. I prefer the upright "standard" riding position. Years of bicycles and dirt bikes, make this a natural position to ride for me. Also, almost any bike that is "laid back" will come standard with terrible rake/trail setup and a LONG wheelbase. The trail on most cruisers is in the 5" plus range, with many above 6"! These bikes are made to track straight - not for carving twisties. Comfortable for getting there, but YUCK in the corners! I want a comfortable ride like anyone else, but not by sacrificing that much cornering ability.
Cruisers are out.

2. Sport bikes are super nice, but the "attack" seating position and lack of storage make them impractical for touring use. One day soon, I'll pick up a CBR-600 cheap from some kid has low-sided his, strip it bare and trailer it to track days. I’ll never own one that is plated. Sport bikes are out.

3. I never want a liter+ bike. I prefer light bikes, but not because I'm dainty. At 6’4” and 210lbs, there isn’t a bike out there I can’t flat-foot and handle easily. However, I feel you lose something indescribable the bigger the bike gets. I think it's a visceral feeling you have when astride a small, nimble machine.

When I was a kid, a BIG bike was a 750 (I know much of that had to do with tariffs on imports, thanks to Harley and Davidson going up to Capitol Hill and lobbying against Japanese imports - but still).

These days, we have things like the 2.2 liter Triumph Rocket. No thanks - doesn't fit my riding style. If I wanted to ride in a straight line for a thousand miles for days on end, 2.2 liters might be a choice for me. However, I'd rather floss my teeth than do an IBA ride because I have always been "the path less traveled" kind of guy. No offense, if there were some kind of back road and curvy IBA certification, I'd be in. On the east coast it's particularly difficult to make good time off the "interslab." And, the harder those IBA
certifications get, the more you are restricted to the Eisenhower Super-Slab Complex.

4. Integrated storage is not necessary, but a huge plus. I have fiddled and fussed with soft luggage for years on my dirt bikes, and I really came to envy all those guys who have storage compartments on their bikes. With their integrated storage, sport-tour bikes appeal to me in this area because I feel that adding aftermarket saddle bags and top cases can really ruin the graceful lines of a bike.

The search for a new bike was on.

I briefly considered the sport-tourers; ST, FJR, Connie... But, they all broke the liter barrier, cockpits were cramped with limited foot position (6'4" - remember), and they were heavier than I wanted. I do have to say that, of these, the FJR was my favorite.

I then moved on to the standards: As an adventure-motorcyclist type, the VStrom, F650GS, Versys, and F800GS all appealed to me greatly. I was about to settle on the Strom 650 with aftermarket hard uggage and highway pegs, when while on the Suzuki site one day…

An interesting combination of features kept making me gravitate to the Burgman 650 page. The first was the excellent steering geometry. With a trail of 4" and a rake of 26 degrees, a Burgman has steering geometry that is more akin to a sport-tour bike. Next, was its seating position. You could sit upright with your feet flat, like I like, but you could also kick your feet out forward like a cruiser in the straights to get more comfort when you need it. At 524lbs dry, it wasn’t exactly light (by my dirt-bike standards), but it was lighter than any sport-tour with a much lower center of gravity than a typical bike – exaggerating the light feel. The Burgman also had copious amounts of integrated storage; 1 gallon less than a typical sport-tour and about half that of a large touring bike (14.8 gal Burgman, 15.8 gal FJR, 33 gal Goldwing). It had great reviews. But… deal killer: it's an automatic! Why would a serious motorcyclist consider something that shifts itself? I don’t even own, nor have I ever owned, a CAR that shifts itself. Why would I compromise my standards for this bike?

It was back to the V-Strom, but I held off buying one for months, because the V-Strom and my XR650L seemed to overlap a great deal in capability. I wondered, “Am I just going to try to make a dirt bike out of a ‘Strom?” – which is something many have done by mounting skid plates, TKC-80’s, hand guards, etc. I’ve been down the road of customizing a bike for adventure travel. After more than $2000 in upgrades for the XR650L – I craved the out-of-the-box “put the key in it and go” of a sport-tour.

Months went by. Winter ensued. A December business trip to Hawaii left me and my boss with a Saturday red-eye and nothing to do all day. Both being avid motorcyclists, we decided to rent bikes from Big Kahuna Motorcycles. He rented a Harley Nightster, I got a Burgman 400 - they didn't have a 650. An all-black Harley Nightster riding around with a pearl white Burgman 400 should have created a tear in the space-time continuum, but we somehow survived.

What I found out that day was that a Burgman 400 is more fun than it has a right to be. :cheers: It ought to be illegal, it is so damn fun. I smiled all day - except when we switched bikes for a short time. I noticed that one thing a Harley does exceedingly well is make you feel like a bad-***. The Nightster, however, was not fun to ride. I wanted the Burgman back, and fast! When we pulled over to swap back (I think we were swapped for less than 10 miles), my boss said the Burgman made him feel like he was "getting away with something." It does make you feel like a hooligan. If you are tied up with your image, get the Harley. If you want to have fun, get the Burgman.

The thing that struck me right away about the Burgman is how it wants to fall into the corners. It takes very little counter-steer to initiate a turn. I assume this is from the small diameter tires. Most bikes have large diameter tires that act as huge gyroscopes. Large diameter tires on a typical bike are also a lot of “un-sprung weight” – something any racer, dirt or street, will tell you is bad. The 400 was absolutely agile in the twisties.

The 400 lacked the acceleration I desire out of a bike, but here is something funny and interesting: The Burgman 400 had all the get-up-and-go of the 883 Nightster I also rode that day - so sad for Harley- Davidson.

I was also surprised by how fast the 400 could go. Although it took it's time getting there, 70mph was no sweat during a short jaunt on the H-1.

I was worried about grabbing a handful of rear brake (thinking it’s the clutch) when maneuvering at slow speeds – like when pulling into a parking spot. At this point in my motorcycling experience, performing this action is pure muscle memory. During my ride on the Burgman 400, I did accidentally do it a couple
of times, but it wasn’t something that tossed me off the bike violently. It is easily compensated for if you make that mistake – it’s the rear brake. If Suzuki had the brakes mapped opposite, this could be big trouble!

The only thing I liked nearly as much as the handling characteristics of the Burgman 400 was the storage capacity. The trunk took both our helmets, both our jackets, and all of our other misc gear when we stopped for lunch. The Burgman accomplishes this feat all without awkward saddle bags or a bulbous
top case to ruin the bike's lines.

This brings me to its looks. A Burgman has clean, simple lines that make it fashionable, but in an understated sort of way. From the profile, it is unmistakably a scooter, but from the front, it could be a sport-tour or sport bike. Personally, I think the 400 looks nicer (trimmer, maybe?) than the 650.

Comfort was unbelievable. As a big fella, I felt well accommodated in the Burgman's spacious cockpit. Although we only rode 150 or so miles, I was ready to do it again when we pulled back into the rental lot.

In short; I fell in love. BUT - that stupid automatic transmission! I only rode the 400 - and it has no manual mode. Maybe the 650 will make up for what the 400 lacks in power and transmission. I needed to test a 650.

Early this spring, I met someone who had a 650 and gave her a spin. I fooled with manual mode for a bit, but I found that I had to think about what gear I was in more than I did on a "true" manual. Most folks on this forum say they don’t use manual much, but prefer power mode. So, in power mode, I sat on a barely used freeway on-ramp, held the rear brake, rolled the throttle onto 3k rpms, released the brake, twisted the throttle to the stop, and accelerated to 85mph indicated before merging with interstate traffic about 1/4 mile later. SENSATIONAL. Mind, a Burgman 650 is not going to kill a V-Max, but it has all the acceleration of my XR650L, and maybe a little bit more. And that's cool, considering it is about 200 pounds heavier.

It wasn't the power of the 650 that amazed me as much as it was how it was delivered. The only way I can describe it to someone who has never ridden a Burgman before is to equate it to takeoff in a passenger jet. You feel the surge as fuel and air is applied, your rear slides backward into the seat, and you are pushed seamlessly forward to top speed. The power delivery is silky smooth. :happy2:

Regardless of the failings of manual mode, my dislike for the CVT dissipated. I will always prefer FULL manual, but CVT is a compromise I think I can make for all the other strong points of the Burgman 650.

These strong points, in the end, made me think of the Burgman 650 as a "light sport-tour." It may not have the acceleration the sport-tours can generate, but it had nearly the same storage, more wind protection, more comfortable seat and seating position, nearly the same handling characteristics, better braking with finer all-hand controls - what's not to love?

Suzuki offered $1000 off holdover 2009 models this spring due to sluggish sales caused by our terrible economy. I rode a black non-executive home for mid 7k OTD – a bit higher than I would like, but the dealership I got it from was the only one within a 300mi radius with a 2009.

I am content with non-executive status. I don't want the extra added weight and complexity of the electric motors that run the windscreen and the mirrors, I won't have a pillion rider that could use a back-rest, and the exhaust in all black looks better on an all-black bike. If I’m a purist with a transmission, you can probably guess what my opinion is of ABS and the weight that system adds. I'm also considering how I can reduce weight further by removing bits I can live without - like the parking brake and center stand.

I am still in the break-in stage, but my love is growing. Also, I’m warming up to the CVT. I’m coming to realize the thing I liked least about this bike (on paper), is really its defining characteristic. A Burgman is a transmission, first and foremost. It has a seat and an engine to make it ride able, but it is a transmission above all else...

And the good-natured poking has already begun. My friends tell me they just don’t envision a big guy who is also a career Marine with 3 combat tours riding a scooter. They all think big cubic inch Harley better fits my image. No thanks – I AM NOT AN “IMAGE.”

In the end, it comes down to this: In my motorcycling experience, the Burgman 650 is the ultimate comfortable cornering machine. Its ample brakes allow you to brake WAY late into the corner. The steering geometry and small diameter tires let you FALL over into the apex. And, when you roll on the throttle, you will always be in the right gear to power out the exit – all while riding in superb comfort (and a 12-pack on ice tucked neatly beneath your seat). I'm goin' to Carolina in my mind. Look out all you poser-boys – my “scooter" is coming for you. :twisted:
http://www.burgmanusa.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=52436

These Canadian testers were also in for a surprise...

Scoot-Touring the Honda Silverwing and Suzuki Burgman
http://www.onewheeldrive.net/2006/10/04/scoot-touring-the-honda-silverwing-and-suzuki-burgman/

Keep it in mind if you are looking for a top top notch all arounder. And value for money is superb.

CT2835-1.jpg


and damn is it fun in the twisties. :D
 

Flywheel

Well-known member
There's a triple comparo on CMG Online, I think, with the sv650, V-Strom 650 and the Burgman 650.

The T-Max is supposed to rock as well. It's a bit annoying, really. Motorcycles are not supposed to be practical, but they try so hard to be virtually useless on our straight, protestant highways.

The big scoots come along and say, "Sure, we're not bada$$, but let's face it, you're dumb AND ugly AND you nearly flub that easy corner on River Road EVERY TIME, so why not take a proper seat (under which many sixes may be carried)."

Damn you Honda for not bringing in the NT700V. Now I'm probably going to end up on a scooter. Thanks a lot.

Here it is: http://cmgonline.com/images/stories/archives/CMG_test_rides/05_SV_Burgman_DL650s/index.html
 

MacDoc

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and never flub the corner either..it really truly does the twisties very :D

Yeah the NT700 is cool but pricey.

What about a big Aprillia as well...

The world's fastest scooter unveiled - 75 bhp 850cc V-twin
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but you can pick up the Burgman as low as $4k - fantastic tech for the price point.

•••

Damn you Honda for not bringing in the NT700V. Now I'm probably going to end up on a scooter. Thanks a lot.

Y'know what - the first time you get the **** faced grin on in the twisties you'll get over the "scooter" angst right quick

Then there is that power button and stop lights :D
 
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Baggsy

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Makes me glad I decided to wait until I can't lift my leg over the seat anymore.
 

MacDoc

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Actually forgot to mention that aspect. I had mild rheumatoid arthritis and hiking my leg over the KLR was a chore at times so that was a factor at the time.
Got a very curable form of cancer a couple of years ago and side effect of the chemo was to get rid of the worst of my arthritis ( known effect - no breakthrough. )

But with a backrest and a topcase, the step through is way easy compared to trying to hoist a stiff cold leg with rain gear on over the back.

and did I mention the storage :D
Three glove boxes up front
54 L under the seat ( 2 helmets and jackets )
and I added 54 more on a matching topcase.

Buddies Vstrom up front - the Burgman behind - part way up Whiteface

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Picture23-2.jpg


Cleaner than hanging stuff off the sides and way more weather protection up front.

•••

Heylerds.....yeah very good read and the guy is articulate about his skepticism and reason for choices.
For a new to Burgman rider he nailed it quickly.....it's the tranny and all that flows from that design choice.
 
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Venom01

Well-known member
Makes me glad I decided to wait until I can't lift my leg over the seat anymore.

My dad got the 400 which sorta surprised me at first seeing the history of big 1000+ CC bikes he's owned over the years. However with the simple commuting he does everyday to work and what not he decided to get the burgman. Now in my family we were never scooter haters, in fact my first ride I owned was a little riva 180. In one season of riding to school and just around in general I put 15,000km on the thing, heck I had to get new tires for it in 1 season alone. However we never actively search for scooters. It had been years after when dad said he bought the burgman 400. I went over to check it out. I wasn't expecting much.....untill I put that thing into some corners. In a word WOW! That thing goes beyond a commuter, it a mini touring machine. Sure it won't break 200kph but it can easily break any posted speed limit, and it still remains sturdy and agile. Not to mention how much storage its got. I still love the dumbfounded look on other bikers faces when I go to a store on the scoot. First it the look of resentment (huh, gay ass scooter) then the chuckles I see them omit when I come out of the store with my purchase (groceries, tools, whatever). Then the look on their face when all The sudden the seat raises up and everything in my hands disappears into the "hidden" trunk and then a full face helmet comes out. This was especially funny when I did this at the beer store with a 12 of beer. All in all its not a sport bike by any means I'd say EXCEPT in its cornering. It not really laid back like a cruised but it has the comfort and highway ability like a cruiser. Yes I do miss banging through gears a bit when I'm on it but in a way that doesn't really "fit" with the way this machine rides. Mabey its because I have a motorcycle that I can push a bit, and yes really it hard to compare my 750f to a burgman, but when on my bike its different then the feeling or riding style I have on the burgman. I borrow that thing from my dad and it all smiles. I'm having fun doing simple riding when simple riding with my bike feel slow or boring. All in all what a great machine Suzuki made. If some people could just get over themselves and what their conception of what "image" they have of themselves and just try one I'm sure they would love it to. I mean how many times do I read "don't wave to scooters" on this forum alone? I think that a motorcyclist that likes the idea of variety or never judged a machine before they tried or at the very least educated themselves about it are true bikers. Its too bad. This is one ride that some people will never get to experience possibly because of a pre determined notion they have about scooters. Too bad.

Sent from my Nexus One using Tapatalk
 

MacDoc

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Good post and accurate assessment. The 400 is particularly sweet around town like the Silverwing tho a bit underpowered.
The lady at the grocery store I hit at midnight can't understand how I can get $100 worth of groceries home on the mcycle....don't have the heart to tell her that since I got the top case that's only 1/2 the storage used up. :D

If you like the 400 tho the 650 is a whole other universe. ;)

Had a chat with Carmine about them up at the Shed today. Forks was open tho lots of leaves and mud patches so no pushing it.
 
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MacDoc

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Flywheel

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Y'know what - the first time you get the **** faced grin on in the twisties you'll get over the "scooter" angst right quick

Then there is that power button and stop lights :D

I always thought scoots were pretty neat, wasn't aware of Burgman & Company until after my first bike. Previously, the only scooters I noticed were buzzy Vespas struggling along LSB during rush hour.

Once the Kawasaki goes, I can't see why I wouldn't buy one, considering the many advantages.
 

MacDoc

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Me too.....only reason I investigated was trying to deal with sore hands so eliminate the clutch. The came across that article comparing the two main contenders. Found a great price on a Silverwing with very few km on it.

Mine you I always had a hankering for a Pacific Coast and nearly bought one. 800 cc just the perfect engine size for a intermediate tourer.

NEWGIVI.jpg


Honda was so far ahead with this. ( there is one this colour drops into the Shed regularly ). So the idea of a medium tourer with lots of inboard storage was there.
My kid rode a Honda Jaz and then a Yamaha BW for a season so was lurking on the scooter forums as well.

I would not go back - just would like an Exec. :D

Scuttlebutt on the Burgman site about a BMW entry.

big_BMW_SCT_800.jpg

Interesting interview with the BMW main two-wheel man in this months magazine, Motorcycle Sport and Leisure - they are entering the maxi scooter market. A machine to challenge the two serious players at the moment -Suzuki and Yamaha will be fully launched later this year. Mr Hendric von Kuenheim, BMW Motoradd boss, is thinking the T max is the one to beat. He came across as dismissing the Bergman as an inferior machine to the Yamaha. The BMW then will be a scooter that thinks its a motorcycle and seek to emulate the T Max in that respect. Tellingly he also talked about the storage capacity as being important and the BMW machine will have an innovative new design to encompass this - it is going to be some machine if it out performs the Yamaha and Suzuki on their plus points.

It will have a unique patened storage system -a world first he says. He gave no engine size or cylinder configuration. If it is not up among the high 600's and a real V twin or flat twin then could be a boring introduction. His team of engineers and designers tell him they have fully met his brief of "more dynamic,more agile,more efficient and make it easier to handle".
http://burgmanusa.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=52528&sid=7a0f89fe0476ba3719325dc7459d52db
 
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Shaman

Well-known member
The wife has a 650. My only complaints about it are that the legroom feels a bit cramped to me, and it's a lot heavier than it looks. Heavy means she's dropped it on herself once and hurt her foot... this is not a suitable vehicle for the short or of low strength. It can boss you around if you need to move it manually.

But it will do 190km/h. Maybe more. :shock:
 
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Rob MacLennan

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There might be fewer scooter haters if Suzuki had actually produced the G-Strider; a vaguely Akira-esque cruiserish monstrosity, that I thoroughly love the looks of.

My first bike was a Honda Elite 250 that I put around 60K on while commuting to school, and generally puttering around.
 

Baggsy

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The wife has a 650. My only complaints about it are that the legroom feels a bit cramped to me, and it's a lot heavier than it looks. Heavy means she's dropped it on herself once and hurt her foot... this is not a suitable vehicle for the short or of low strength. It can boss you around if you need to move it manually.

But it will do 190km/h. Maybe more. :shock:

Any bike will hurt if you drop it on your foot. The weight on the 650 is low, so it should be easy to lift if you use the proper technique no matter how short/weak you are. I've seen small women lift a Goldwing back up so that should not be an issue.
 

MacDoc

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The wife has a 650. My only complaints about it are that the legroom feels a bit cramped to me,

for sure - the first thing many do is pull the factory back rest which opens up a few more inches and gives you a choice of height as well. Third party seats are also popular. I assume you meant cramped in the lazy boy position as feet straight down always feels odd.

and it's a lot heavier than it looks. Heavy means she's dropped it on herself once and hurt her foot... this is not a suitable vehicle for the short or of low strength. It can boss you around if you need to move it manually.
damn right - when I was coming off chemo it was the boss and I had to be very cautious in awkward angled pavement. The weight is down low so not so apparent until it gets away.
I suspect that some of the good deals are from the shorter and weaker riders who got in over their heads on it.
I knew my strength was back when I wrestled out of some deep gravel in a driveway.

The weight down low helps on gravel roads - I don't mind them at all and it's good practice in my view for street riders to get some dirt skills. Opens up more roads in PA etc. tho this was a tad over the top - had to call on some old scrambling skills - damn GPS said it was a road not a streambed. And those are rocks not leaves.

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Picture115.jpg


My Silverwing was such a deal - guy was 5' 4" and the wide stance due to the floorboards makes it all the worse. He only put a couple thousand K on in 3 years.

The Burgman 650 I got I still don't understand. 1600 km in 5 years!!!. It was just broken in and mint. could never figure out the story there. Had to make sure all the seals etc were okay. Still half the price of a new one and it's been solid.

I can flatfoot mine ( I'm 5' 9" ) which helps paddle the weight out of tight parking.

But it will do 190km/h. Maybe more. :shock:
The speedo is 10% off in the upper range but official top end is 105 mph - more than adequate and it gets to 140 kph right quick thanks to the tranny.
I'm sure with your wife's weight it goes big time if she hits the Power button.

400 Burgman or the Silverwing might have been a better choice.
The Silverwing commands too high a price especially given the mandatory maintenance at 25k $$$.

••••

G-Stryder....cool

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more http://www.gizmag.com/go/2303/picture/3275/

Maybe the look of a redesigned Burgman with the 900 cc engine :D
 
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Shaman

Well-known member
I can flatfoot mine ( I'm 5' 9" ) which helps paddle the weight out of tight parking.

That's another thing you reminded me of. Every time I take it for a boot I find myself wondering how she flatfoots it, as it's so wide... then I remember that there's a thinner section of the fairing designed for standing/moving while mounted. It's in a slightly odd position even with the seat back all the way, imho.

Still, a lot of machine for the 5k we paid for it in great shape and only 2400km on it.
 

MacDoc

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Yeah - that little narrow section is useful. Is she riding with the backrest forward? That for sure would make you feel cramped.

The thing that sold me is the value for money and incredible longevity....there are riders with 50 and 80k MILES on theirs with no major repairs. ( one report of someone with 140k miles !!!! )
That's GWing turf but at 1/6th the price.

The high cost of the belt on the Honda SWing was one reason I dumped it. Got into the Burgman for $1k out of pocket on trade and it had only 1600 km on it. I was facing more than $1k in mandatory maintenance on the Honda.
Best deal on a bike I've made.

Hoping to take it to Australia with me in 3 years unless a sweet Exec comes along tho the more toys on the Exec means more things to break......still ABS on the wet roads in Cairns has a great appeal.

Damn - there is a deal for someone $3700 for a 650

http://ontario.kijiji.ca/c-cars-veh...ISER-SCOOTER-PRICE-REDUCED-W0QQAdIdZ280544913

looks clean too

0729jaa_20.jpeg
 
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Venom01

Well-known member
I do have 1 minor complaint and that is I did not like how flimsy the stock windscreen was on the 400. It really would flop around on the highway. However we installed a Givi windscreen on it and it cured that right away.

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kiwi

Well-known member
Hoping to take it to Australia with me in 3 years unless a sweet Exec comes along tho the more toys on the Exec means more things to break......still ABS on the wet roads in Cairns has a great appeal.

How much do you think it would cost to ship it there?
 

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