Ducati Monster 821 or BMW R NineT Pure | GTAMotorcycle.com

Ducati Monster 821 or BMW R NineT Pure

Tommy G

Member
I,m a new rider ( haven't in 30 yrs ) and looking at the bmw R NineT Pure and the Ducati Monster 821. Looking for any feedback on these models hope to buy one within next couple of weeks. Which one would you get any why? Thanks Tommy G
 

nakkers

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I,m a new rider ( haven't in 30 yrs ) and looking at the bmw R NineT Pure and the Ducati Monster 821. Looking for any feedback on these models hope to buy one within next couple of weeks. Which one would you get any why? Thanks Tommy G
It’s really comes down to which one speaks to you.

Both are appealing in their own way. Naked standards. BMW boxer or Ducati L twin.

I think the Italian might bring out the hooligan in me while the BMW might be a bit more civilized.

I know the beemer has lots of options depending on what you like. Seat, wheels, etc.

Good luck with whatever you decide.


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GreyGhost

Well-known member
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As with all bike posts. Check insurance first. As a new rider, insurance is brutal. It may help make the decision for you (for instance if the Duc is $2000 a year more than the BM, you may decide that the BM is the right choice for you).
 

Trials

Well-known member
The BMW is super practical to the point of almost being uninspiring, Ducati is more an enthusiast motorcycle. I would buy the BMW if I wanted to ride it all the time all over the place, the Ducati if you are just playing around and want to ride something that feels very competitive & built to go fast.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
Awesome insurance price is a concern as well as maint and reliabilty.

Thanks Tommy G
Heritage style bikes are sold on style, performance and comfort are secondary. Choose the bike that gives you the most wood (not us).

Any Euro bike will be a lot more expensive to maintain and repair than the alternatives, even if you do your own work. Parts are expensive, service locations limited -- dependability and operating costs aren't going to match the Yamaha and Kawi alternatives.
 

Trials

Well-known member
Heritage style bikes are sold on style, performance and comfort are secondary. Choose the bike that gives you the most wood (not us).

Any Euro bike will be a lot more expensive to maintain and repair than the alternatives, even if you do your own work. Parts are expensive, service locations limited -- dependability and operating costs aren't going to match the Yamaha and Kawi alternatives.
You don't believe a BMW is as dependable as a Yamaha or Kawasaki? :unsure: you gotta be kidding.
 

Lightcycle

Motorcycle Nomad
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Have you test-ridden either?

The riding feel is very different from each other.

The Ducati's engine is more free-revving and will feel faster despite having similar hp to the R nine T. The BMW engine will feel like a tractor in comparison but will have more pull/torque at low revs. The Monster will like to stay in the higher rev range, while the BMW is completely opposite.

The BMW is slightly heavier, but carries its weight down low due to the boxer engine. When you pick it off the sidestand it will feel lighter than the Ducati, but it is not as flickable through the turns as the Monster.

If you are picking a bike for canyon carving (or whatever passes for that in Ontario), I'd choose the Ducati. For cruising, I'd choose the BMW.

R Nine T looks better than the Monster, IMO.
 

Tommy G

Member
That is what I'm concerned about everyone keeps telling me stick to the big 4. I'm asking if anyone has had a issue or a reason not to get a Ducati, BMW or even Triumph. For what ever reason those brands seem to get me.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
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That is what I'm concerned about everyone keeps telling me stick to the big 4. I'm asking if anyone has had a issue or a reason not to get a Ducati, BMW or even Triumph. For what ever reason those brands seem to get me.
It's very hard to find a modern japanese bike with soul. That matters to me in a bike. That means I am drawn to euro bikes. Yes the japanese bike may be faster, it may be cheaper to operate and maintain, but it just doesn't do it for me (for the most part, there are a few exceptions).
 

Trials

Well-known member
Last bike that I tried to help stranded at the side of the road interesting enough was a modern Triumph. We were not successful in getting it going but he did arrange for Woody to rescue him with a truck.
BMW is not an inspiring ride, they simply don't even aim for that in their regular street rides, but it will ride safe and dependable to the point of almost boredom, the bike will wear you out before you wear it out assuming you take good care of your toys. Does that sound like you, or do you want something to tinker with lots and take out for a blast once in a while 🏍

Best advice is to buy one of each, call one go fast and the other go far.
... then you just need a go anywhere to complete the set.

You know what, you haven't ridden in 30 years, the BMW will be the easiest to ride.
 

Lightcycle

Motorcycle Nomad
Site Supporter
That is what I'm concerned about everyone keeps telling me stick to the big 4. I'm asking if anyone has had a issue or a reason not to get a Ducati, BMW or even Triumph. For what ever reason those brands seem to get me.
I believe these brands are desirable mainly because of marketing and exclusivity. You don't see as many of them on the road as compared to the Japanese bikes.

However, some models do have their fans because of their unique features. There's nothing too different about an F800R to any other parallel twin/chain-drive Japanese motorcycle, but get an R-bike and you're suddenly into weird Telelever/Paralever suspensions, horizontally opposed engines, single-sided swingarms mated to shaft drives, etc. Ducati's have Desmodromic valves, and the older models had trellis frames and dry clutches.

These bikes are truly engineered very differently and if you're a fan of owning and riding something out of the ordinary (not necessarily better), than these models are the bikes to look at.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
You don't believe a BMW is as dependable as a Yamaha or Kawasaki? :unsure: you gotta be kidding.
I know BMWs are not as dependable.

Had my fair share of them (the cage type). Note in the table below the last 4 brands have Euro designed and built drivetrains (UK, Italy, Germany then Austria).

Reliability by brand (Consumer reports - sample size 12,300 motorcycles)
BrandPercent failed
Yamaha/Star11%
Suzuki12
Honda12
Kawasaki15
Victory17
Harley-Davidson26
Triumph29
Ducati33
BMW40
Can-Am42
 

Trials

Well-known member
... but get an R-bike and you're suddenly into weird Telelever/Paralever suspensions, horizontally opposed engines, single-sided swingarms mated to shaft drives, etc. Ducati's have Desmodromic valves, and the older models had trellis frames and dry clutches.

These bikes are truly engineered very differently and if you're a fan of owning and riding something out of the ordinary (not necessarily better), than these models are the bikes to look at.
The BMW has a dry clutch also, except it is hydraulic operated.
Read "weird" as all good he listed from what I see, every one of those things does something good, not weird.
 

Lightcycle

Motorcycle Nomad
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The BMW has a dry clutch also, except it is hydraulic operated.
Read "weird" as all good he listed from what I see, every one of those things does something good, not weird.
They do some things better but there are also disadvantages.

While a Telelever prevents front-end dive on hard braking, you also lose front-end feeling compared to conventional forks. I wouldn't want telelever on a race bike.
Dry clutches have less drag and more power conversion than wet clutches. They're also quick to change in the pits, but their lifetime is shorter than a wet clutch.
Shaft drive is less maintenance-intensive than a chain drive (in theory - BMWs have endured endless final drive problems) but they are heavier than chain & sprockets and suffer more power loss.
Single-sided swingarms allow for quicker wheel changes, but they are not as strong as double-sided swingarms.

My opinion is that you have to decide what's important for your style of riding.

But I think for most people, it comes down to: "That single-sided swingarm is Teh Sexay!" and "Hey, I just installed an open clutch cover, now everyone can hear my dry clutch jangling like I'm masturbating with loose change in mah pocket!"
 

Trials

Well-known member
You are getting your BMW technology mixed up, the bike he is looking at has telescopic front forks, the telelever counter-acts rear wheel hop (jack-shafting)
Mine is one that hops. but his fuel tank would be steel and mine is alloy which is way more :cool:
oh and shaft drive on a motor that is already spinning longitudinally only makes sense, just as it makes no sense on one with a traverse motor.
BMW longitudinal motors would suffer a power loss by using a chain :LOL:
 

Lightcycle

Motorcycle Nomad
Site Supporter
You are getting your BMW technology mixed up, the bike he is looking at has telescopic front forks, the telelever counter-acts rear wheel hop (jack-shafting)
I was talking about technologies in general, not the R Nine T specifically. I'm aware it has forks.

oh and shaft drive on a motor that is already spinning longitudinally only makes sense, just as it makes no sense on one with a traverse motor.
True...

BMW longitudinal motors would suffer a power loss by using a chain :LOL:
However, in an R-bike, the flywheel and tire are spinning transversely to each other. You will get power loss either way from a shaft or chain. Whether the conversion happens at the flywheel or rear axle is academic. More weight penalty from a shaft than a chain.
 

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