Do I really need an ABS ? | Page 3 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Do I really need an ABS ?

Allistonfjr

Well-known member
No offence but you're just buying insurance, that's not really learning to ride the motorcycle.
No offense taken.
I wear full gear and don’t ride on bald tires either. That’s insurance as well.


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jc100

Well-known member
I wonder if ABS will save you if you use the front brake on dirt/gravel instead of rear brake?
Or is the tire washing out not a function of the wheel locking, but rather slipping??

In other words, does washing out have anything to do with the front tire locking out, or can you wash out even with the front tire rotating freely?
I have some fancy dancy linked off-road abs program on my bike that apparently means I can grab a fistful of front brake on gravel and still be fine. Haven’t had the balls to fully try that one yet though (or fully put faith in it).
 

sid_for_speed

Well-known member
I have had them for both my bikes...so far so good
 

Trials

Well-known member
You might want to install a steering dampener as well.
... and buy a trials bike so you can practice getting good at crashing ;)
 

xrljoel

Well-known member
I have some fancy dancy linked off-road abs program on my bike that apparently means I can grab a fistful of front brake on gravel and still be fine. Haven’t had the balls to fully try that one yet though (or fully put faith in it).
I tried it on my KTM on a sand covered stretch of asphalt. I rode up to 40 or 50 KPH then squeezed hard enough to lock the front brake in a straight line. The wheel would skid momentarily, brake hard, skid and brake hard, but not full lock. My 2012 has first generation ABS I suppose the newer systems are likely smoother.

It's worth trying out in a limited way like I did, but like you I wouldn't rely 100% on it to save my arse. There's no substitute for developed skill and experience, but every little bit that helps in the end is a good thing.
 

jc100

Well-known member
I tried it on my KTM on a sand covered stretch of asphalt. I rode up to 40 or 50 KPH then squeezed hard enough to lock the front brake in a straight line. The wheel would skid momentarily, brake hard, skid and brake hard, but not full lock. My 2012 has first generation ABS I suppose the newer systems are likely smoother.

It's worth trying out in a limited way like I did, but like you I wouldn't rely 100% on it to save my arse. There's no substitute for developed skill and experience, but every little bit that helps in the end is a good thing.
Mine is a 2015 KTM super adventure, great bike, the limiting factor is the large mass on the saddle.
 

Iceman

Well-known member
Even if the ABS magically takes care of corner braking you can still crash by leaning badly, steering badly, poor throttle control, improper body positioning or simple loss of traction. What if they come out with a completely self driving motorcycle fitted with outriggers, would you want one? You might as well just ride the TTC.

& lol try following somebody like Jordan Szoke for a while and I guarantee you'll wonder if his brake light is even working.
No offence but you're just buying insurance, that's not really learning to ride the motorcycle.
You might want to install a steering dampener as well.
... and buy a trials bike so you can practice getting good at crashing ;)
You're really starting to appear to be the forum troll around here.
Not sure why so much disdain for rider aids.

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nakkers

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I try not to generalize but, if it’s a new rider that has no experience on two wheels, I’d recommend abs.

If you’ve had time to develop skills in the dirt or trails etc, it’s less of a factor.

Many riders develop bad habits such as relying only on using the front brake or knowing the value to trail braking under certain conditions etc.

Is it a must have? As been mentioned, you can allocate the funds to other areas.

R3 is a sweet ride btw.


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Trials

Well-known member
You're really starting to appear...
Why do you feel that, because I express an opinion that does not correspond to your own? Sorry about that.
If it is any consolation, riding season is here so I'll be spending much less time on internet and you can get to hear it from somebody else.

... and what the heck is wrong with me suggesting a steering dampener :/ whatever.
Ride safe & be well, if I see your bike or anyone else's stranded at the side of the road I would be the first to stop and assist, that's how it really is.
 

Baggsy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
No offence but you're just buying insurance, that's not really learning to ride the motorcycle.
I'm not getting your technology is bad argument.

You can still come close to threshold braking with ABS, and when you go over, the ABS kicks in, instead of you going down.

Should we go back to bikes with drum brakes?
After all, aren't disc brakes just insurance, and not really learning to ride, as well?
 

r3r3r3

Well-known member
Just my $2c as someone who went with the non-ABS version of the R3. This bike is definitely geared towards the beginner rider. The stock non-ABS brake is responsive but extremely hard to lock-up by accident - this is no dual caliper R6/R1 typical sport bike brake setup. Even on sandy/wet/low traction situations as long as you have half a brain its pretty hard to fully lock-up the front wheel. That being said there is no doubt that ABS is the “safer” option. But if you are serious about riding and take the time to learn the braking dynamics of the bike it is EXTREMELY forgiving. When I eventually jump up to an R6 I will 100% be going the ABS route.

As others have said if the extra $1000 is the difference between taking additional training or not I would vote go non-ABS and get training. You are more likely to have a crash from running wide, target fixating, etc. before you front flip the bike or low-side from a lockup.
 

Evoex

The God
Site Supporter
When I eventually jump up to an R6 I will 100% be going the ABS route.
It's only available on the latest model, not sure if you were aware.
 

klr_guy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I thought used bikes more cheaper but looks like not a big difference.
Buying in the spring often mitigates the gains of purchasing a used bike.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
I'm not getting your technology is bad argument.

You can still come close to threshold braking with ABS, and when you go over, the ABS kicks in, instead of you going down.

Should we go back to bikes with drum brakes?
After all, aren't disc brakes just insurance, and not really learning to ride, as well?
That's not an apples to apples comparison.

Nobody is going to argue that ABS are less safe or worse than standard brakes when they are called to action on road - you will stop faster.

There is an argument in learning how to ride a bike what doesn't have ABS, particularly learning emergency braking that's more than squeeze the hell out of the brakes. But the biggest argument for me is for those who learn to use ABS and don't learn to use a dual brake system. I've watched more than one rider use only the foot pedal on their bike. This won't be everyone, but rest assured there are riders out there who use only one brake control. Is this OK in a modern technology brake world? I guess it might be, as long as you stay on a bike with those types of controls.
 

Lightcycle

Motorcycle Nomad
Site Supporter
I've watched more than one rider use only the foot pedal on their bike. This won't be everyone, but rest assured there are riders out there who use only one brake control.
Ah yes, the cruiser riders: "I never touch the front brake!" and "Had to lay'er down to avoid hitting that car!" :rolleyes:
 

Baggsy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
That's not an apples to apples comparison.

Nobody is going to argue that ABS are less safe or worse than standard brakes when they are called to action on road - you will stop faster.

There is an argument in learning how to ride a bike what doesn't have ABS, particularly learning emergency braking that's more than squeeze the hell out of the brakes. But the biggest argument for me is for those who learn to use ABS and don't learn to use a dual brake system. I've watched more than one rider use only the foot pedal on their bike. This won't be everyone, but rest assured there are riders out there who use only one brake control. Is this OK in a modern technology brake world? I guess it might be, as long as you stay on a bike with those types of controls.
It sounds like you're more against linked brakes and people who don't learn to use the brakes than against ABS.

A new rider should be able to get a bike with non-linked ABS brakes, and learn to use the brakes properly.

Many, if not all of the gearing up courses, use bikes without ABS or linked brakes.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
It sounds like you're more against linked brakes and people who don't learn to use the brakes than against ABS.

A new rider should be able to get a bike with non-linked ABS brakes, and learn to use the brakes properly.

Many, if not all of the gearing up courses, use bikes without ABS or linked brakes.
I'm actually for technology and like linked and ABS brakes. I do think learners ought to be responsible for learning to handle all the basic controls on a motorcycle.
 

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Learners have enough on their plate and ABS is soon to be mandatory ...I don't see any case for a noob that can afford ABS not buying it for street riding and commuting.
 

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