Advice for first 2up Ride... | Page 6 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Advice for first 2up Ride...

jibbijib

Well-known member
My gf is getting used to riding with me now, and it almost feels like shes not on the bike. Still a bit tricky at times, but she's learning. Another girl I have taken out is really good, and it doesn't even seem like shes on the bike at all. Also took my gf's little sister on the bike for a quick rip, and even when she leaned away from the turn, I was able to handle it. Was a little worrying, but I compensated for it. But it was basically like having my backpack on while I was riding.

I keep teasing my gf about dragging pegs with her on the back, and eventually I think I'll get her that comfortable with it. Already had her with me for some highway on-ramp fun, and she did well with it!
 

Triple

Well-known member
Site Supporter
tell her shes allowed 2 free helmet smacks. 3rd one means you pop the clutch at 11,000.
I might have to use that with my wife! My second helmet (passenger helmet) has numerous scratches on the visor from her headbutts!
 

matt1256

New member
A good tip for getting the passenger to lean without worrying about them doing anything stupid is to tell them that on any turn they are to look over your inside shoulder and keep their eyes looking to the destination. It does a combination of a) keeping the passenger at the correct lean angle and b) keeping the passenger from looking at the ground, getting that falling sensation and making it dangerous for you. It also helps them feel like they are part of the ride.

Remember that 2up riding puts a ******** of responsibility on the driver. No matter what happens, they are putting themselves in your care. If you don't have the experience in terms of solo riding, don't take a passenger.
 

Jeff Dee

Member
Any tips or pointers you guys can give me to avoid banging helmets with my passenger??? I have no idea (i've never been a passenger myself) where to tell her to place her head as we're riding. The helmet smacks do get annoying...

I ride a mighty Ninja 250 (if this helps any bit)

Thanks!
 

petieboy

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Any tips or pointers you guys can give me to avoid banging helmets with my passenger??? I have no idea (i've never been a passenger myself) where to tell her to place her head as we're riding. The helmet smacks do get annoying...
My wife says the only way to avoid it really is to keep her hands on the tank when the bike's slowing down. On a 250 that shouldn't be a long stretch for the passenger.
 

Trainman

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Any tips or pointers you guys can give me to avoid banging helmets with my passenger??? I have no idea (i've never been a passenger myself) where to tell her to place her head as we're riding. The helmet smacks do get annoying...

I ride a mighty Ninja 250 (if this helps any bit)

Thanks!
Here's what me and my "passenger" came up with...turn it into a game...every time she hits it's a point...after X amount of points it's time for her to pay up, just use your imagination if you know what I mean. ;)

it's a win win situation really, she doesn't have to feel bad about hitting my helmet and it makes it easier for me to tolerate it. hehehehe

Interestingly enough my passenger only seems to be getting worse when it comes to helmet tapping, I wonder if she's starting to actually enjoy out little game...not that I'm complaining. :laughing8:
 

Vlad

Banned
Site Supporter
Any tips or pointers you guys can give me to avoid banging helmets with my passenger??? I have no idea (i've never been a passenger myself) where to tell her to place her head as we're riding. The helmet smacks do get annoying...
Both you and your passenger are responsible for that annoyance. You should brake more smoothly and the passenger should pay attention and hold on.
 

Zyrgy

New member
Site Supporter
Since it's all been said, I want to emphasize that what they said it TRUE. It's not just being said, and it's not a minor difference. My first passenger was my brother and I didn't bother mentioning about leaning. For whatever reason, he leaned opposite of the corners, and it was not an experience I would care to repeat.
 

ct70

Member
whats the smallest displacement (cc's) for taking a passenger?


yeah i had a 200lb on the back of mine lol (no it wasnt a girl lol )

at the riding school they said its doesnt matter what engine size you have
 

stank killa

Member
Site Supporter
This thread was extremely helpful. I went on my first two up ride today after two years of riding solo. Told the old lady what to do from the pointers on this sticky and everything went well.

We started off with her hugging me in what was basically a bear hug, however it quickly wore out my arms holding up the weight while braking. After a bit she started placing her hands on the tank while braking and slowing down, that worked perfectly. Cornering she kept a sudo-bear hug grip.

Anyway thanks again.
 

hammer886

Member
When I ride with a passenger I always ask them to do a few simple things that makes both of our lives easier. First is finding out how they like holding on. Put the bike on a center/paddock stand and try it out. Does she feel more comfortable holding on to you? Do you have passenger grab rails? I've had one passenger who liked leaning forward and putting her hands on the tank. None are better then the other it is just a comfort factor for the passenger. I then let the passenger know the a few rules. They must keep their feet on the pegs. If they feel the need to shift body position I ask them to do this while we are not cornering. I ask them to always look in the direction we are going. Some passengers tend to lean the wrong way in corners. This can be very disconcerting for the driver. I have found that if I can get the passenger to put her head on the inside of mine during a corner that they will automatically lean correctly. I also let them know to never mount or unmount from the bike until I tell them it is ok. The first time with a given passenger I'll let them know that I'll periodically give them a thumbs up question to gauge how things are going. If they give me a thumbs up back then I keep on doing what I was doing. If not I pull over and ask what they found wrong.

One of the things you can do to make the ride more pleasant is to adjust your suspension knowing you will have a passenger. The really can make things better.
I'm with him. Also, add extra tire pressure. :cool:
 

Kokla

Well-known member
tell her shes allowed 2 free helmet smacks. 3rd one means you pop the clutch at 11,000.
Epic.

EDIT: This post gained me a beautiful negitive rep, so I tought I would put more thought into the post:

I found it quite funny at the time, that qoute, being about "dumping" a friend. Short and sweet was my goal, give my view in as few words as possible. Sadly enough, it was not constructive and I see that now. :(
 
Last edited:

l84toff

Well-known member
This has been a fantastic thread. Just want to say thanks for all the intelligent comments and suggestions. Awesome stuff for people learning to ride 2up.
 

Nimbus

Member
As an experienced passenger on my bike, I've found that "freezing" before and during a corner, it acts as though theres no extra forces while turning. My dad made it clear to me that moving at all in the turns caused lots of problems, so he suggested that I just stay straight and still through the turns. I was lucky to have a backrest to lean back against. I didn't lean my head in any direction. I just acted as an attachment of the bike.

I always made sure I was "adjusted" before we started moving. That means getting the little guys in a comfotable spot lol. Also, taps and communication were very important.

Any type of handle at your sides really makes the ride much better. Because when turning, the extra weight thrown on your body from someone having the arms around your waist kinda screws you up. Plus, you dont have that hot sticky back problem.

I have yet to have a passenger, but I've already devised some strict rules for passengers. This thread really helps though, because I had some questions about it.

Anyway, safe riding everyone!
I agree with your Dad, much easier to deal with an increase in mass that's fixed than one that is shifting as a variable distribution of weight. If it's fixed as he suggested then regardless of the additional weight it really only affects the performance(braking and acceleration, etc.) and little else. If a passenger follows those instructions and the machine is rated for the extra weight there is no reason a smaller rider can't carry a heavier passenger than themselves.
 

Jia

Well-known member
I did my first 2up ride the past weekend and it went very well. I basically agree with the two fellows above.

I told her to not think about anything too much, when I turn or lean don't purposely try to do anything, just go with the flow of things. Told her not to be scared when we lean, as the bike won't fall for no reason. Told her everything will feel natural. She held my waist but it wasn't too tight.

I did a few laps around a parking lot first to get use to turning, leaning, accelerating, but the problem is couldn't get to speed to get use to braking. I had to learn that on the street. But she soon found out right after that parking lot test that everything did seem natural, and nothing was really forced, there isn't too much thought in it, trying to keep it simple.

When on the road, I would ask her at long stop lights how things were, make sure everyone and everything is fine.

The biggest difference is braking power, and we all know how important it is to brake. Brake much earlier than usual, I can't stress this enough. And as others say, you must instruct her when to get off. My girl got off a bit too early when I was at the pump and the bike almost dropped, but I held it up (phew! as it was my brothers bike!). We were basically stopped but anything the passenger does you're not expecting will have a big effect, whether that is on the road riding/turning/accelrating/braking/stopped/about to get off/about to get on etc.

I unfortunately didn't read this thread before that ride as I don't frequent this site (use to now I do)

We were on a Suzuki GS500, not the most powerful bike, but still plentiful if you get on it with 2up.

My friend that had two stroke 250 use to take people all the time as well. So no it really doesn't matter the CC of the bike. Just look at Vietnam, whole families are transported on their 125cc bikes.
 
Last edited:

skitta

Well-known member
I was recently a passenger with someone who had not ridden with a passenger before. I was his "guinea pig", so to speak.

He, and the ride, was great! Before we started out, he gave me very specific instructions, and told me what certain taps from me would mean to him. We rode around my neighbour before we headed to our destination and even practiced an emergency stop. He gave me thumbs up and pats on the knee, which was encouraging to me that I was doing ok as a passenger.

It's important for passengers to listen and follow the driver's instructions. I they don't or can't, they shouldn't be allowed to be a passenger. JMHO
 

FreeFloat

New member
any advice for carrying a passenger that's about 50lbs heavier than you?

i'm a girl, and a lot of my guy friends (6ft plus)want to ride with me, and i don't because i don't know if i can handle the weight.
I'm a girl too! I ride a Suzuki GS550L... it's a smaller "naked bike" so not huge and not heavy.

That said, I recently took a friend for a ride.

I'm 5'2" and weigh around 130. The friend is 6" and (I found out later) weighs about 280 (!).

The biggest thing I noticed was that at the stops, I needed both feet on the ground, rather than one.
 

Top Bottom