30+ motorcycle restoration tips for first timers | GTAMotorcycle.com

30+ motorcycle restoration tips for first timers

adri

Well-known member
Site Supporter
After a couple winter and spring projects under my belt, I put together a list of 30+ motorcycle restoration tips... because in this city you can't go a week without meeting someone who wants to "restore an old motorcycle and turn it into a cafe racer" ...yeah.

Tried to cover a little bit of everything - tips on buying, strategies going into your project, actual doing it advice, problem-solving tips, and some thoughts for after your project is complete.

Warning, it's like 4,000 words, so if you're ADD as ****, this probably isn't for you. Then again, if you can't sit through 4k words maybe a long term project isn't a good idea for you either? *shrug* Whatever, anyway, after some lessons learned the right way, and some lessons learned the stupid way, here's my best advice: Motorcycle Restoration Tips - YouMotorcycle
 

killvino

Well-known member
Awesome write up.
Really appreciate this being put out there.
Have a current project going on but had fun reading preparing for next one.
 

ninjanewbie

Well-known member
I'm handy at fixing stuff, never did anything with restoration, but I definitely loved reading the blog.
Great layout, easy reading, and just real good straight to the point information :)
 

adri

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Awesome write up.
Really appreciate this being put out there.
Have a current project going on but had fun reading preparing for next one.
I'm handy at fixing stuff, never did anything with restoration, but I definitely loved reading the blog.
Great layout, easy reading, and just real good straight to the point information :)
Thank you both for the feedback. Just doing what I can! Let me know if any specific questions come up and good luck :)
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
My thoughts are: If a person has never restored a motor vehicle and wants to try buy an old gas lawn mower and do a total rebuild and restore. Deal with rust, old paint, bad motor, parts, decals, gaskets, chrome, wheels / tires etc.

It will save you more time on the bike than you spent on the mower. It will cost you $500.00 to restore a $10 dollar mower and then you can sell the mower for $50.00. Another lesson.

I really liked the recommendation to call in a mechanic when needed. All too often people overestimate their skills and the project becomes a basket case.

There are thousands of cars, pieces of furniture, boats and bikes out there that have cost more to restore than they're worth. It's called heritage and it isn't cheap. Kudos to those that have contributed.
 

TK4

Well-known member
Simple Green or any other type of non-caustic cleaner is very handy. I get the big jug, pour into a bucket, drop in parts and let sit overnight. That can save a lot of needless scrubbing, especially for small finicky bits with lots of nooks and crannies.
 

crankcall

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Very well written , and a breath of fresh air in an industry where so much motor journalism is " dude, check this out!!"

well done
 

adri

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Loved your idea of starting on something cheaper/smaller to get started...

It will cost you $500.00 to restore a $10 dollar mower and then you can sell the mower for $50.00. Another lesson.
...and then laughed out loud at this ^ Truth!

Simple Green or any other type of non-caustic cleaner is very handy.
Will give this a shot at some point, thanks. We went through quite a few bottles of carb cleaner last year.

Very well written , and a breath of fresh air in an industry where so much motor journalism is " dude, check this out!!"

well done
Thank you!! Means a lot.
 

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