Is the SFV650 a good starter bike? | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Is the SFV650 a good starter bike?

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
is built for smaller riders...you are a new rider size large - stick with the X for size and ergonomics and the ability to look around you.

You are not boy racer and may never want to be the CBR-r is for wannabe track riders.
The desirable Xs start at 2016 and up. 2019 even better for your size,

I do think you would be okay with a Vstrom 650 and there are simply a ton of them for sale and a superb support forum.
 

mimico_polak

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Yeah I think I'm gonna opt into the cb500f or cbr500r
I had the F, the Rebel and now the X. I love the bikes. While I consider them tools without souls they do what I want with no fuss.

Reliable, good on insurance, good on gas, great on city and highway….really can’t say anything bad about them.

The F will have an issue with wind as there is no fairing to really protect you. The Rebel was just not comfortable or fun, and the X is very comfortable riding position.

EDIT: I’m only 5’7 and 180.
 

Gbyrd

Member
is built for smaller riders...you are a new rider size large - stick with the X for size and ergonomics and the ability to look around you.

You are not boy racer and may never want to be the CBR-r is for wannabe track riders.
The desirable Xs start at 2016 and up. 2019 even better for your size,

I do think you would be okay with a Vstrom 650 and there are simply a ton of them for sale and a superb support forum.
Thanks for the input, I'll look into the vstrom as I am taller and it would be bothersome to be in a bad posture for a long time as I'd only be able to ride for more than 15m.
 

800over

Well-known member
I'm 6'2 250 and ride an Gladius. It is a great bike and I can ride it all day.. but I agree with all those who said start with something slightly smaller. If you grab something used you'll be able to flip it without much loss and get what you like....and what you like will change after you have ridden for a bit and figure it out.
 

bastak

Well-known member
My opinion is that the Gladius is a decent choice. The 500cc Hondas are also excellent options.

From the bikes I've owned (SV650, TU250X, GSX-S750, Scrambler Sixty2, GSX-R600) I honestly think that the SV (3rd gen) is the easiest to ride of the whole bunch - the Gladius is pretty much the same bike. For me, it's the sum of the parts that work in a way to make it easier to just focus on riding and nothing else. The Scrambler had grabby front brakes, a temperamental gearbox, some false neutrals, hard to find neutral, lots of heat etc... TU has a very short first gear, rudimentary gearbox, weak rear brakes, lack of power for the highway, more of a city bike, etc... Not saying that they aren't great beginner bikes, but these are things that are on the mind when riding, consciously or subconsciously.

So the SV/Gladius has a punchy motor that needs to be respected as a new rider, but ergonomics are good, low seat height, good throttle response, excellent gearbox, reliable, brakes have good feel and aren't grabby, suspension is perfectly fine for the street, easy to maintain. Decent choice.

And if you ever get sick of riding street like I did, it makes for a great first track bike!

gladius_20trphy_20fond_20blanc.jpg
 

SVeezy

Well-known member
My opinion is that the Gladius is a decent choice. The 500cc Hondas are also excellent options.

From the bikes I've owned (SV650, TU250X, GSX-S750, Scrambler Sixty2, GSX-R600) I honestly think that the SV (3rd gen) is the easiest to ride of the whole bunch - the Gladius is pretty much the same bike. For me, it's the sum of the parts that work in a way to make it easier to just focus on riding and nothing else. The Scrambler had grabby front brakes, a temperamental gearbox, some false neutrals, hard to find neutral, lots of heat etc... TU has a very short first gear, rudimentary gearbox, weak rear brakes, lack of power for the highway, more of a city bike, etc... Not saying that they aren't great beginner bikes, but these are things that are on the mind when riding, consciously or subconsciously.

So the SV/Gladius has a punchy motor that needs to be respected as a new rider, but ergonomics are good, low seat height, good throttle response, excellent gearbox, reliable, brakes have good feel and aren't grabby, suspension is perfectly fine for the street, easy to maintain. Decent choice.

And if you ever get sick of riding street like I did, it makes for a great first track bike!

View attachment 50938

+1 for sure


Sent from my iPhone using GTAMotorcycle.com mobile app
 

Gbyrd

Member
I appreciate everyone's feedback! I think I'm still gonna opt for the cb500f or cbr500r, I'd prefer the cb500f tbh and I hope to level up my skills to be able to do my M2X next year, will likely go to learning curves. The gladius is definitely one that I'm extremely interested in but I wanna make sure I don't get too much bike for myself.
 

Gbyrd

Member
you'll feel much like a pretzel on the SV ...upright riding is like the CB300F or for your size the CB500x is safer and more comfortable. A Vstrom 650 is okay given your size.
Even a KLR650 works for you but depends if your insurance is cc based entirely

There are also variations on the SV as some are more radical seating than others.

You can check the seating position. My son had the SV650s and he was hurting after an hour riding.
Yamaha FZ6 is excellent if insurance allows but again you might feel cramped.
You would for sure on a CB300F or any of the CB300 variations.

CB500x would be perfect if you can find a deal but high prices

loads of Vstroms tho

This is a super deal 2012 Suzuki 650 Vstrom $ 3,300 | Sport Touring | City of Toronto | Kijiji
Don't be afraid of the mileage. They are very durable and you are big enough to use it as a starter
Hwy thanks for this tip, I think I might get the vstrom after all after going through this all week. I'm also wondering if I should be targeting a bike with abs.
 
Last edited:

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Hwy thanks for this tip, I think I might get the vstrom after all after going through this all week. I'm also wondering if I should be targeting a bike with abs.
I always recommend abs for street bikes, especially for new riders. Make sure you take its intervention as a warning that you were pushing too hard and almost went down. If you are triggering abs often, fix your riding style.
 

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Yes get ABS ....I'm happy to have it on the CB300F here as the wet season and range roads made braking "exciting" with the VERY marginal KLR brakes.

New riders for sure will benefit tho you should still practice hard braking in a safe environment. Despite your size any 650 is a handful if the rear end gets away....and a front wheel wash out is something you really don't want.
Just be careful with the Vstrom as it can feel top heavy with a full load of fuel so be careful with the front brake on slow manuevers.

I'd love to see you get some off pavement experience to add to your skills toolbox. There are courses and paid tours. Makes you a better street rider and gives you confidence in unexpected road conditions. Enjoy.
 

Gbyrd

Member
Yes get ABS ....I'm happy to have it on the CB300F here as the wet season and range roads made braking "exciting" with the VERY marginal KLR brakes.

New riders for sure will benefit tho you should still practice hard braking in a safe environment. Despite your size any 650 is a handful if the rear end gets away....and a front wheel wash out is something you really don't want.
Just be careful with the Vstrom as it can feel top heavy with a full load of fuel so be careful with the front brake on slow manuevers.

I'd love to see you get some off pavement experience to add to your skills toolbox. There are courses and paid tours. Makes you a better street rider and gives you confidence in unexpected road conditions. Enjoy.
Thanks, I did do learning curves. I was stalling the bike day 1, day 2 I managed to get perfect on the m2, and it was in the rain. I think it was an awesome experience to get both weather exposure even though you probably don't want to ride in the rain sometimes it shows up without warning. I'm unsure of any other courses you'd need to do? Besides getting on the bike itself and just doing parking lot drills and going through traffic in desolate areas.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Thanks, I did do learning curves. I was stalling the bike day 1, day 2 I managed to get perfect on the m2, and it was in the rain. I think it was an awesome experience to get both weather exposure even though you probably don't want to ride in the rain sometimes it shows up without warning. I'm unsure of any other courses you'd need to do? Besides getting on the bike itself and just doing parking lot drills and going through traffic in desolate areas.
You don't need to do any other courses. More knowledge and skills are never a bad thing. Macdocs point was some time in the dirt makes you more comfortable when the bike is moving around under you. Trailtours and a few others have bikes and instructors. There are also advanced riding classes in parking lots that have nothing to do with licensing, just skill development. Also intro to track day courses to show you what bikes are really capable of and how far away from that you are on the street.
 

Gbyrd

Member
Thanks for all the input. I ended up opting for the gladius. Rode today, I'm just going to take baby steps as I get back into riding, and being very careful about my speed. But I can see how easy it is to just completely throw caution to the wind on a bike. What a rush
 

MacDoc

Well-known member
Site Supporter
nice - had to look it up.
s-l1600.jpg
 

Top Bottom