HOW TO RIDE IN A GROUP | GTAMotorcycle.com

HOW TO RIDE IN A GROUP

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svan

Guest
Less experienced riders out front

One thing which is not addressed in these videos: less experienced riders and people without ABS should be towards the front, and most experienced riders should be towards the back of the pack.

The main reason is that the less experienced riders and people without ABS need more distance to stop. If your group has to do a panic stop, and you've got an inexperienced person behind you, they're going to end up in your tailpipe. In addition, should anyone go down, the more experienced riders behind them will be better able to get out of their way.
 
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knockedout

Guest
Re: Less experienced riders out front

svan said:
One thing which is not addressed in these videos: less experienced riders and people without ABS should be towards the front, and most experienced riders should be towards the back of the pack.

The main reason is that the less experienced riders and people without ABS need more distance to stop. If your group has to do a panic stop, and you've got an inexperienced person behind you, they're going to end up in your tailpipe. In addition, should anyone go down, the more experienced riders behind them will be better able to get out of their way.
ABS? Sorry, but ABS is mostly reserved for big cruiser and touring bikes... not to mention ABS doesn't really do much for cutting down stopping distances, but rather keeps the wheels from locking by cutting down braking power.

A relatively new rider on a sportbike will probably outbrake a big 800lbs Goldwing with ABS by a mile. That one really doesn't play a role.

Not to mention that you're putting newbies ahead of you and creating the possibility of having to deal with their problems when they do something stupid.
 
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svan

Guest
Cruisers and tourers ride in groups too, ya know.Or did I miss the "sportbikes only" sign out front? Anyway, I don't want to get into what ABS does and doesn't do.

It goes without saying that if you have people you don't trust in your group... don't ride in the group.

But speaking personally, I'd much rather have someone less experienced in front me where I can watch them, than behind me.
 

Wadadli

Well-known member
Looks to me like the other riders stuck a nail in the tire of the ZRX... I guess you have to be careful who you decide to ride with
 

spawnx66

Active member
Re: Less experienced riders out front

A relatively new rider on a sportbike will probably outbrake a big 800lbs Goldwing with ABS by a mile. That one really doesn't play a role.
Thats assuming that the sportbike rider is an expert braker. Under emergency braking situations I would be willing to bet that those riders with ABS will stop their bike safely more consistently than those riders without ABS.

Not to mention that you're putting newbies ahead of you and creating the possibility of having to deal with their problems when they do something stupid.
I prefer idiots in front. That way you have some control of their distance to you.
 

ecyl

New member
ima newbie here but ive done some research
it seems that its best to have most experience rider in the lead and tail.
then you would have your intermediates followed by newbies with experts followin to make sure everyone is ok
 
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Sv_Ridah

Guest
ima newbie here but ive done some research
it seems that its best to have most experience rider in the lead and tail.
then you would have your intermediates followed by newbies with experts followin to make sure everyone is ok

ecyl is absolutely right. what ecyl describes is the safest way to ride in a group with members of various levels of riding skill.
 
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YZFR1DSmith

Guest
wow.. or u can just ride with ppl that u trust.. chances are that if there is a noob in the group there gonna try and show off.. i would rather them on a different street lol.. but all in all put em up front then u have no worries about them trying to pull a wheelie into u or clipping ur bars when they arent paying attention..

just my two cents
 

Brian P

Well-known member
Moderator
Site Supporter
In view of certain recent situations, maybe it's time to refresh memories and update this.

Read the link on the first page, and play the little animations. Take note of a few things ... such as passing a car ONE bike at a time. The second rider to pass should wait until the first bike is clear of the car before starting the pass. If you don't do this, and something goes wrong with the first rider's pass or the BDC (brain dead cager) does something dumb, then you could get taken out, collide with the other bike, or collide with the car. When the group is passing a car, EACH rider is responsible for making sure THEIR individual pass of that vehicle can be done safely. If there is a hill or blind spot approaching ... hold back. And if you are the rider *behind* that rider who is holding back ... DON'T PASS. Wait for them to do it, just as indicated above. If you are that second rider, and you want to chance it but the first rider doesn't ... and the first rider then determines it is safe after the second is already in the process of passing ... there's going to be a big mess when the first rider moves left into the path of the second one that is already passing.

once again, to bring the point home even further ... If I'm next in line to pass that car with my 55 hp FZR400, and you are waiting to pass with your 240 hp ZXGSXRFZ1400, YOU WAIT FOR ME TO FINISH BEFORE YOU START. The fact that it's going to take me 5 times longer to do it is not relevant. It's not safe for either of us, until I'm done and ahead of the car. There should only be ONE bike in the passing lane at a time, going around that car.

Other stuff not really addressed by the other posts.

When there is heavy traffic, go with the flow of the traffic. DON'T treat the heavy traffic as a slalom course. If you do ... there will be phone calls from cagers, and you might find the po-lice out looking for you. Not good. The entire group should follow the flow of traffic. That includes both the leader and all of the followers.

Never, ever, EVER, pass another bike in the same lane, except if the first rider motions the following rider to pass (which means the lead rider is aware of the following rider's actions).

Don't ride side-by-side with another bike. If either one of you spots a rock or pothole or oil slick or whatever, then you are probably both going down, instead of both having an escape path.

Residential streets? keep the revs, noise, and speed down to avoid phone calls from residents.

Want to do a stunt during the group ride? Better not hit another bike or any other vehicle; that's all I have to say.
 

Toronto122

New member
I always try to make sure that I can see the eyes of the rider infront of me...that way I KNOW he can see me (if he choses to look back that is!! LOL). It just makes me feel better. I also look for down/up shifts from the rider infront...again, let's me know sooner what's happening.

I leave my pride at home too...If I'm outclassed, I don't care. If I don't chose to go 55 degrees in a corner, that's my choice. It doesn't matter how "new" I look, as long as I'm comfortable. No matter who you are, there's always someone willing to do something you're just not as skilled at, I have nothing to prove. I know my bike's not the best handling, or the fastest on the road, and to try to keep up with a GSX-R1000 is foolish and dangerous.
 
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TootToot

Guest
wow.. or u can just ride with ppl that u trust.. chances are that if there is a noob in the group there gonna try and show off.. i would rather them on a different street lol.. but all in all put em up front then u have no worries about them trying to pull a wheelie into u or clipping ur bars when they arent paying attention..

just my two cents
Um...think that's a bit of a generalization there. There are newbies out there who want to learn safe riding techniques and who are not irresponsible at all. They may make mistakes but that's how you learn. You know what happens when you ASSUME, don't you? Try not to be so judgmental toward us noobs.
T
 

BusaBob

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Just a question to the more experienced group riders out there:
When approaching a 4-way stop or T intersection, can you stop as a group and then proceed as a group, or does each rider have to individually come to a full stop before proceeding through the intersection individually?

I ask simply because I don't know.

My instincts tell me that the law would require EACH vehicle to come to a complete stop at the intersection before proceeding through it. However, this is likely to completely break up the group, especially at a busy intersection, wouldn't it? In a group of 2-5 bikes, I'd prefer to move through the intersection as a group to keep it intact.

Goldwinger, please feel free to comment.
 

rydr4lyfe

Active member
Site Supporter
As a motorcycle is a vehicle and by law all vehicles must come to a full and complete stop at a stop sign, each person must stop, wait for thier turn, then proceed. Also, since it is technically illegal to have two vehicles sharing the same lane (regardless of size, with the exception of bicycles) each of the motorcycles must stop as an individual. Yes, you may "break up the group", however, if you have a chance to pass the vehicle in front of you safely and legally you can get the group back together again. Either that or pull over into a mall/hotel/parking lot and line up and just wait for a large enough gap that everyone can leave in.
 

lil red bird

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Just a question to the more experienced group riders out there:
When approaching a 4-way stop or T intersection, can you stop as a group and then proceed as a group, or does each rider have to individually come to a full stop before proceeding through the intersection individually?

I ask simply because I don't know.

My instincts tell me that the law would require EACH vehicle to come to a complete stop at the intersection before proceeding through it. However, this is likely to completely break up the group, especially at a busy intersection, wouldn't it? In a group of 2-5 bikes, I'd prefer to move through the intersection as a group to keep it intact.

Goldwinger, please feel free to comment.
This is where as a rider leader you have to judge if all your grup can make it into the gap or do you have to filter through the stop and regroup on the side of the road.
 

BusaBob

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Yeah. I thought so, but wanted to make sure there wasn't a special exception for groups of bikes.

Thanks for the info, though.

cheers.
 
Re: Less experienced riders out front

What is this all about SPAWNX66???

"I prefer idiots in front. That way you have some control of their distance to you."

Do you consider beginners Idiots???
I am a new rider and I am looking forward to go on a ride with experienced drivers so I can learn from them.
Don't forget that you had to learn too at some point in your life.

I hope I will be able to go on a ride with more understanding and patient riders.
 
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lil red bird

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I have not knowingly ridden with spawn but i understand his point I know what my bike can do under breaking i do not know how well yours can do. If you are in the back of the pack you can open up a gap to allow for more time to respond and more breaking distance. I know of some great riders that suck at riding in a group.
 

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