Grinding edge on brake rotor | Page 2 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Grinding edge on brake rotor

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
To take off a ridge, I would use a file not a hone. If you are feeling extra lazy and this is right at the edge of the rotor, a light touch with a grinder on a spinning disc will turn the ridge into a valley in seconds.
I've never tried it but a set of diamond sharpening stones from Princess Auto might work as well.

images
 

sburns

Well-known member
A buddy rides his harley the same, 90% rear.
He gets his pads in packs of 3. They must be from china. He's on his 3rd set of rear pads this year already.
Well I found out the hard way the less expensive pads don't last as long as HD's pads. 🤷‍♂️ I bought EBC from F9 which I believe started all this mess.
 

GreyGhost

Well-known member
Site Supporter
I've never tried it but a set of diamond sharpening stones from Princess Auto might work as well.

images
Are rotors hardened? I have no idea/ I've never run a file across one to check. If they aren't hardened, you shouldn't need to waste the money on diamond. I save diamonds for skis and knives.
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
Site Supporter
Are rotors hardened? I have no idea/ I've never run a file across one to check. If they aren't hardened, you shouldn't need to waste the money on diamond. I save diamonds for skis and knives.
For $20 they'll cut down a dull hard chisel edge faster than any other hand stone I have.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
I use the rear brake a lot. Yes just replace pads not rotor. I've been through 3 sets of rear pads since getting the bike. I think the second set caused the grove since it wasn't a HD set and wore out quicker then the other sets.
Brakes pads come in a variety of formulations, some are tougher on rotors than others. Most OE pads are organic, after market might be ceramic (stintered) or metallic. If you choose metallic pads, you will get better braking, however the tradeoff is noise (squeek) and more rotor wear.

Inspecting pads and rotors often tells you what's wrong (following points may no apply to all caliper types).
Pads:
  • If the outboard pad is thinner than the inboard (piston side), glide pins might be sticky
  • If the inboard pad has more wear, your caliper(s) may not be retracting
  • Grooves in pads - rotor surface imperfections
  • Wedge shaped wear to pads - worn guide pins
Rotors:
  • Raised ridges on rotors - defective rotor (resurface or replace)
  • Pulsing/Out of round - heat damage - sometimes you can feel this, sometimes you need to measure. Check caliper pins, and pistons
You can safely remove and chamfer a lip on the outer edge of a rotor, it's a little harder doing the inside edge. A small grinder hand held works best.
 

Renboy

Well-known member
What machining process would you suggest he use to do this?
4.5" angle grinder with flap discs would be ideal. An air grinder with cookies also works well, or even just a drill with cookies will work. If he's a Mennonite, a file.
 

Top Bottom