Bicycle Protests | Page 11 | GTAMotorcycle.com

Bicycle Protests

LePhillou

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Licencing has been tried and often recinded - that's true. But times change, just because it failed before doesn't mean it's over. Cycling has had a huge uptick in recent years, there are thousands of bikes sharing the roads, both urban and rural. I'd like to see municipalities license bicycles, here's why and how I'd do it.

Why?
- simplify identifying riders for enforcement
- connect education to the issue of annual stickers
- fund cycling infrastructure

How?
- Like snowmobile and atv clubs. Let the cyclists collect the fees and drive the use of proceeds as a kicker to develop, improve and maintain specific use infrastructure.

There are about 2M+ bikes rolling around Toronto, a $10 annual fee would generate $20M to fund bike paths.
I personally would love to pay to focus on funding more alternate transportation infrastructure improvements (not necessarily just bikes, but pedestrian, transit, etc). I'd open the proverbial chequebook in the blink of an eye.

But overall, the cost to implement this bureaucracy for 2M+ bikes considering all the red tape and inefficiencies government agencies come with would probably suck up most of that $20M funding lol
And in a lot of cases, cyclists will bike around different municipalities in the GTA, so you have to have different jurisdictions work/communicate together on this and agree to this, which, unless it gets pushed by a provincial governing body, probably won't happen.
The problem too with having cyclist associations be responsible to maintain/upgrade infra is that often times that same infrastructure is handled/maintained by the municipality so we'd have a lot of conflicting priorities with those separate bodies. Snowmobile/atv/dirtbike clubs operate outside of those spheres for the most part. They build and improve on networks that are 95% of the time only being used by them, and also are in the hobbyist domain, where as the in cycling you have hobby/recreational cycling, fitness cycling, commuting/transportation cycling and each one of them tries to attain a different goal.

Then once pass those hurdles and they have their cycling licensing course/education, we expect them to redo it how often? And starting at what age? Because for other vehicles once you pass the initial courses, you can be a d!ck every year on the roads while just having to pay to renew. You just have to not get caught which millions of people do every single year, for the rest of their lives. When i helped with M2 exit course evals one summer, i saw a good handful of people fail because of bad habits they'd developed over the few years they'd had their M2 license, even after having spent the weekend doing a refresher course, what's not to stop cyclists from doing the same mistakes, they're the same human beings in the end that adapt to their imperfect environments with imperfect behaviours.
Part of this education could be delivered in schools and practiced there as well, like its already done in other parts of the world; Have it as part of gym class so they're not alien to it when growing up, that way it makes up a bigger part of the culture from a young age and behaviour around different road users is better understood.
 

GreyGhost

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That’s what I’m saying to the officers when I stopped driving 150kmh.
You can try whatever you want. The problem is the politicians that lower the number on the sign while doing nothing about road design. Cops just enforce the laws they are given.
 

raginduck

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Except that they got both him and his accomplice for the same thing


Read a little about it... he had a sign on his car.. and they did for about 80kms, off and on, occasionally let cars pass them... and then blocked it again.
 

nobbie48

Well-known member
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I personally would love to pay to focus on funding more alternate transportation infrastructure improvements (not necessarily just bikes, but pedestrian, transit, etc). I'd open the proverbial chequebook in the blink of an eye.

But overall, the cost to implement this bureaucracy for 2M+ bikes considering all the red tape and inefficiencies government agencies come with would probably suck up most of that $20M funding lol
And in a lot of cases, cyclists will bike around different municipalities in the GTA, so you have to have different jurisdictions work/communicate together on this and agree to this, which, unless it gets pushed by a provincial governing body, probably won't happen.
The problem too with having cyclist associations be responsible to maintain/upgrade infra is that often times that same infrastructure is handled/maintained by the municipality so we'd have a lot of conflicting priorities with those separate bodies. Snowmobile/atv/dirtbike clubs operate outside of those spheres for the most part. They build and improve on networks that are 95% of the time only being used by them, and also are in the hobbyist domain, where as the in cycling you have hobby/recreational cycling, fitness cycling, commuting/transportation cycling and each one of them tries to attain a different goal.

Then once pass those hurdles and they have their cycling licensing course/education, we expect them to redo it how often? And starting at what age? Because for other vehicles once you pass the initial courses, you can be a d!ck every year on the roads while just having to pay to renew. You just have to not get caught which millions of people do every single year, for the rest of their lives. When i helped with M2 exit course evals one summer, i saw a good handful of people fail because of bad habits they'd developed over the few years they'd had their M2 license, even after having spent the weekend doing a refresher course, what's not to stop cyclists from doing the same mistakes, they're the same human beings in the end that adapt to their imperfect environments with imperfect behaviours.
Part of this education could be delivered in schools and practiced there as well, like its already done in other parts of the world; Have it as part of gym class so they're not alien to it when growing up, that way it makes up a bigger part of the culture from a young age and behaviour around different road users is better understood.
Dougie and company can't make car licence plates pay for themselves and trying to do anything with bikes opens the doors to push scooters, skate boards, roller blades etc. Why should they get to roll free?

It would have to be a provincial law or a person couldn't ride from their Mississauga home to their Toronto job, visit a friend etc.

Testing, re-testing and education. They can't get that right with cages. Who would be paying for the facilities and staff?

Lots of cagers have been driving for a half century and never retested. I'm one of them (Other than my M)

The snowmobile associations have done a good job taking the machines from the early days where farmers were trying to behead the lot. However, I would be amused to see an election debate between self important lawyers, doctors, accountants and other PhD's expounding their cycling views on the rotation of the planet.

I just realized that there were a few times the cyclists implied they wanted specific usage times for the park. Why would they get first dibs? Let them ride at 3:00 AM using a headlight.

Incorporating it into the school curriculum is an interesting idea, particularly in phys-ed. I wonder about the outcome in our neighbourhood where the kids get chauffeured by a collection of SUVs and soccer vans.
 

LePhillou

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Incorporating it into the school curriculum is an interesting idea, particularly in phys-ed. I wonder about the outcome in our neighbourhood where the kids get chauffeured by a collection of SUVs and soccer vans.
And a loooot of school buses.

But realistically, most of these kids are within cycling distance of their schools. And some kids in some countries cycle year round in worse conditions than we get on a day to day basis.
It benefits them in several ways in terms of: independence, navigation and just knowing their neighbourhood better, getting a bit of exercise in and alleviating morning rush hour traffic in residential areas, where a lot of schools are situated. But once again, for the most part we don't have the infrastructure to let a young kid (ie 10 y old) bike by themselves safely
 

FullMotoJacket

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Part of this education could be delivered in schools and practiced there as well, like its already done in other parts of the world; Have it as part of gym class so they're not alien to it when growing up, that way it makes up a bigger part of the culture from a young age and behaviour around different road users is better understood.

The London police came to my public school and set up a road simulation in our gym with cones, little 4 ft. tall stop and yield signs, and a 4 ft. tall functioning traffic light to teach traffic safety/rules of the road. That would have been in 1965(+/-).
 

48Connor

Well-known member
The London police came to my public school and set up a road simulation in our gym with cones, little 4 ft. tall stop and yield signs, and a 4 ft. tall functioning traffic light to teach traffic safety/rules of the road. That would have been in 1965(+/-).
We got bicycle licenses in Grade 1. Had to pass a test at the school fair and you got a faux license with your picture on it and stuff. Was neat for a 6 year old.

This might be just a Durham Region thing but did anyone else go to the Safety Village in Whitby? It was like a mini town set up with buildings, streets, stop lights, stop signs, and street signs, all at like 50% scale. At the time I think we rode bikes around there and the cops there had us doing random things around the town following the road rules. When I was 7 or 8 it was fun.
 

GreyGhost

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We got bicycle licenses in Grade 1. Had to pass a test at the school fair and you got a faux license with your picture on it and stuff. Was neat for a 6 year old.

This might be just a Durham Region thing but did anyone else go to the Safety Village in Whitby? It was like a mini town set up with buildings, streets, stop lights, stop signs, and street signs, all at like 50% scale. At the time I think we rode bikes around there and the cops there had us doing random things around the town following the road rules. When I was 7 or 8 it was fun.
There's still one on Stouffville road in York Region. I've never been in, I've just seen it on the way by.
 

Mad Mike

Well-known member
And a loooot of school buses.

But realistically, most of these kids are within cycling distance of their schools. And some kids in some countries cycle year round in worse conditions than we get on a day to day basis.
It benefits them in several ways in terms of: independence, navigation and just knowing their neighbourhood better, getting a bit of exercise in and alleviating morning rush hour traffic in residential areas, where a lot of schools are situated. But once again, for the most part we don't have the infrastructure to let a young kid (ie 10 y old) bike by themselves safely
That's true. 2 of my kids did a month long grade 12 exchange course in Holland. The hosts had bicycles for them, school was 9km for my son, 12km for my daughter. Rain, most days, snow on a few. No SUV chauffeurs.
 

Baggsy

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My kid taught a bicycle safety course one year for the Ottawa Safety Council. It's still going on as far as I know.
 

GreyGhost

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I'm personally less worried about the average cyclist as I am the DUI mobile guys who unlock the controllers so they can do 70km/h on their 300 pound death machines.
Like with firearms, government doesnt want to appear like they are targeting a specific demographic so they aim enforcement at someone with a cursory relation to the problem.
 

Dimitri

Well-known member
Anything that isn't pedal assist and uses a throttle should be plated and insured with a licensed rider.

As for guns. My guns in my safe are a problem. The thousands of unregistered guns in the hands of gangs isn't an issue. F**k me.
 

nobbie48

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I'm personally less worried about the average cyclist as I am the DUI mobile guys who unlock the controllers so they can do 70km/h on their 300 pound death machines.
My buddy's scooter will do 80 KPH. He's OK but when his kid rides it........
 

nobbie48

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Anything that isn't pedal assist and uses a throttle should be plated and insured with a licensed rider.

As for guns. My guns in my safe are a problem. The thousands of unregistered guns in the hands of gangs isn't an issue. F**k me.
I'm not into guns and don't want to go Yankee.

However all shootings are done with illegal weapons. The moment a legally owned gun is used for crime it becomes illegal.

If you can't get a gun to kill someone, rent a van.

Why are we asking where illegal guns come from instead of asking what makes people want to kill each other?
 

Matt Rain

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I guess one solution for us d*ckheads is to take Ellis up and then go down the west side of the HP loop. Means you only have to deal with one stop sign at the bottom of HP. I shall keep doing that for the time being.

Screenshot_20220806-110320_Strava.jpg
 

Dimitri

Well-known member
Why are we asking where illegal guns come from instead of asking what makes people want to kill each other?

Life is valueless in American culture. We are praised when we value killing in movies, video game, and other media.

We have made killing the sign of manhood and make it appear as control of one's destiny.

Asking what makes people want to kill each other under this context is a very simple question.
 

FullMotoJacket

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Site Supporter
what makes people want to kill each other?

Mark me down for genetics.

23cba390e599621874b6918b1d6140eeb750c2da.gifv
 

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