2022 MotoGP Discussion (No Links - Contains Spoilers!) | Page 12 | GTAMotorcycle.com

2022 MotoGP Discussion (No Links - Contains Spoilers!)

Hardwrkr13

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Priller

Well-known member
Crashlow doesn't finish races.

Which means he'll get exactly as many points as Dovi has been collecting...

I think he knows his job is to collect the start fee and minimise damage. We'll see lots of dicing with his teammate and the Tech3 boys to not finish last.
 

Robbo

Well-known member
Testing some new tech in FP2

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Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Winales_2017

Well-known member
Well, if nothing else people realize why Marc is so missed after today's FP4/Qualy: Aleix's highside looked bad, but consider that Marc could go from that and then fo stright to the box get on the spare bike and make and keep pole position in qualy, whereas Aleix looked what you'd expect a normal rider to go through, which is still incredibly impressive. It's actually really eye opening since it looked rather violent from the onboard, but really an ordinary crash the HRC bike has done to all it's riders.

Well done to Mav for finally putting a good qualy together on that Aprillia, but as is always the case for him I want to see how the race develops for him: the bike looks strong, and this is one of his favorite tracks, so lets hope his mind is in the right place to make things work this weekend, which is always the biggest unknown with him.

Qualy was really tight, and while the track record is really not reflective of normal circumstances (Silverstone looks more like any track Spain or Italy) due to climate change, but it was still good to see so many records shattered like that.

Zarco deserves to win this weekend, his pace has been looking the strongest amongst all of the Ducatis, I hope he and Mav actually duel for it until the end.

Gigi's aero packages have reached meme tier at this point..
 

Chaos

Well-known member
AEsparago's recovery for a good starting spot was impressive. I wonder how he'll feel in the morning. He probably still had a lot of adrenaline going even going through into Q2.
 

Winales_2017

Well-known member
AEsparago's recovery for a good starting spot was impressive. I wonder how he'll feel in the morning. He probably still had a lot of adrenaline going even going through into Q2.

There is a rumor he may not make it on the grid:



“I’m in a lot of pain and it is getting worse, so along with the team and the docs, we decided it would be best for me to rest until tomorrow and then evaluate the situation after the Warm Up.

“I’ll obviously do everything I can to be on the track but, since we’re talking about a part of the body that is highly stressed during riding, we’ll have to see if it’s possible.”


As Espargaro alluded to, a withdrawal from the British Grand Prix would cost him a golden opportunity in the title race.

Here is the crash:

 

BigEvilDoer

Well-known member
Aleix’s crash was violent…
You can’t simply say that “Marc would have shaken it off and been OK” and move on…

Me, i‘ve played contact sports most of my life Until my late 30’s. Taken tons of punishment and lived to tell the tale.
Yet, the first crash on a motorcycle, at low speed, on the track ended up with a broken collar bone.

All I’m saying is every crash or incident is different. Just ‘cause person X survived something without incident doesn’t mean that person Y won’t have catastrophic results simply due to a slight change in vector.
 

gsxr guy

Well-known member
Well, if nothing else people realize why Marc is so missed after today's FP4/Qualy: Aleix's highside looked bad, but consider that Marc could go from that and then fo stright to the box get on the spare bike and make and keep pole position in qualy, whereas Aleix looked what you'd expect a normal rider to go through,
What??? Marc is out due to injury he may never be back.
 

Winales_2017

Well-known member
Aleix’s crash was violent…
You can’t simply say that “Marc would have shaken it off and been OK” and move on…

Me, i‘ve played contact sports most of my life Until my late 30’s. Taken tons of punishment and lived to tell the tale.
Yet, the first crash on a motorcycle, at low speed, on the track ended up with a broken collar bone.

All I’m saying is every crash or incident is different. Just ‘cause person X survived something without incident doesn’t mean that person Y won’t have catastrophic results simply due to a slight change in vector.
Granted, but I meant to say that I don't think anyone can deliver results like Marc has over the years; Aliex is 32 so not that much older than Marc either.
 

Robbo

Well-known member
Just read that Aleix has been diagnosed with a heel fracture of the right foot. Amazing that he raced yesterday but concerning that the on-track medical team didn’t discover this on Saturday.


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Priller

Well-known member
Sometimes hairline fractures need a closer look to see. Bad time to be injured, with non-stop racing coming up. Hopefully he can find treatment in time.

He was lucky Quartararo can't pass when in the pack. Ended up being damage limitation for them both, with Bagnaia the big winner by getting within 50 points of the lead. When I saw how hilariously short the 'long' lap penalty was, I assumed Quartararo would be able to manage it fine, but once he was in the pack, he had nothing to give. Hard to say how it would have played out without the penalty, though he wasn't leading.

Vinales had a really good race, though I'd love to know if his last-lap struggles were a product of tire issues or a mental lapse. He's shown he has pace at the flowing tracks he loves, now we shall see if he can do it somewhere a bit more stop-start like Austria.

Poor Zarco, looked totally confused in the box after his crash. He's gotta get one sooner or later...
 

Chaos

Well-known member
Bagnaia has taken a big chunk out of quartararos lead in the last 2 races. I thought he was a goner but he has a chance again. He's going to have to keep winning but his chances are a lot more realistic than before
 

Priller

Well-known member
Bagnaia has taken a big chunk out of quartararos lead in the last 2 races. I thought he was a goner but he has a chance again. He's going to have to keep winning but his chances are a lot more realistic than before

He's picked up 42 points on Quartararo in two rounds, and 30 on Aleix. He gained lots against Fabio towards the end of last season, but it's hard to know how much of that was Fabio first in damage limitation mode and then checked out having won the title, or how much was the Ducati getting faster combined with tracks that didn't suit the Yamaha.

One thing is for sure: Quartararo's recipe for winning is very fragile. Unless he can dominate the field early and get out of the pack, that Yamaha is a disaster with the tires overheating. In some ways that may explain the huge gap between himself and other Yamaha riders, though they're also struggling to qualify.

I have to say I am torn on the (lack of) treatment Bagnaia has gotten from his drunk driving charge.

I suspect this is because there's no blanket agreement with Dorna and the teams for punishment of off-track issues. It's left to the manufacturers, and at this point, Bagnaia could mass murder children and puppies and Ducati would look the other way if they thought he had a chance for the title. This one is 100% on Ducati, though I don't believe any other manufacturer would be different with a title contending rider.

Going forward, I can't see the teams agreeing to give Dorna that power unless something really egregious happens. It's not like a sports league with a CBA between players and the league.
 

Ash

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Site Supporter
I think it's the FIM that has authority to enforce that sort of thing. The FIM MotoGP regulations cover what happens on track, but the FIM Code of Ethics also appear to cover things that occur off-track:

4.13 I acknowledge and agree that all the above undertakings are
personal commitments and that I may be sanctioned (disciplinary
liability) in accordance with this Code by the Ethical Chamber in
the case of failure to abide by them. Moreover, I acknowledge
and agree that any action or misconduct on my part outside
the “field of play” prejudicial to the interests of the FIM or of
motorcycle sport
(including but not limited to violent or dishonest
conduct, racist, threatening, abusive, indecent or insulting words
or behaviour) may be sanctioned in accordance with this Code
by the Ethical Chamber


Since the FIM initially only gave Fenati a two race ban for almost literally attempting to murder someone on track, I think the DUI thing is just going to slide under the carpet and be forgotten.
 

Priller

Well-known member
I think it's the FIM that has authority to enforce that sort of thing. The FIM MotoGP regulations cover what happens on track, but the FIM Code of Ethics also appear to cover things that occur off-track:

Since the FIM initially only gave Fenati a two race ban for almost literally attempting to murder someone on track, I think the DUI thing is just going to slide under the carpet and be forgotten.

The FIM is one of those classic shady Euro sporting bodies that isn't interested in anything besides lining their own pockets. Add them to the alphabet soup of corruption and grift alongside FIFA, IOC, UEFA, UCI, FIA, etc. Weirdly, almost all based out of Switzerland. They're never going to start levying punishments against riders for off-track incidents, especially as that would open the door to having to police the innumerable riders who participate in the various events and series' that happen under their banner. More importantly, it also might piss off a manufacturer who gives them lots of money...
 

Chaos

Well-known member
The FIM is one of those classic shady Euro sporting bodies that isn't interested in anything besides lining their own pockets. Add them to the alphabet soup of corruption and grift alongside FIFA, IOC, UEFA, UCI, FIA, etc. Weirdly, almost all based out of Switzerland. They're never going to start levying punishments against riders for off-track incidents, especially as that would open the door to having to police the innumerable riders who participate in the various events and series' that happen under their banner. More importantly, it also might piss off a manufacturer who gives them lots of money...

There is no altruism in sports business.
 

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