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Thread: The next race bike

  1. #81

    Re: The next race bike

    Brian Dynojet has a new sensor coming out shortly that is both pull and push so it won't matter anymore.
    The nice thing about the Flexiglass bodywork. It's modified slightly to allow for lower clipons. You should be able to push the wood craft ones forward enough to accommodate your long arms

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  2. #82
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    Re: The next race bike

    That would explain why Dynojet's own website lists the required part for this bike as "dual contact" and no longer gives an option for push or pull.

    I just placed the order for a pull sensor ... they're probably still filling orders for old stock.

  3. #83
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    Re: The next race bike

    I did a test-sit with my boots on. After a small adjustment, footpeg and shift lever positioning seems nice.

    On the other hand, I established that I don't like the R3 Specific clip-ons which were supplied in error. Part of it is that they are not far enough forward, part of it is that they force the controls to be too far outboard. I will have to exchange them for the ones I wanted in the first place - generic 1.5" riser clip-ons for 41mm forks. I've already done the modifications necessary in order to accommodate these ... reduced steering travel, and the instrument panel has been set further forward for more clearance.

  4. #84

    Re: The next race bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian P View Post


    The CFM rearsets provide only limited adjustment, but based on a test-sit, they are where they need to be. I may have to raise the seat up a bit for legroom, at the moment I'm thinking to just use longer bolts for the seat and shove washers underneath where the seat bolts down.
    Why dont you just duct tape a seat cushion from a wheel chair on top of the stock seat???

  5. #85
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    Re: The next race bike

    I'll save the racetrack fixes for the racetrack. Doing something properly now avoids having to bodge it later...

    Rear brake line, rear brake reservoir delete are installed and the first safety wire is in place.

    Two big chores are ahead. One is replacing the shift detent spring - the clutch basket has to come out to do it. The other one is installing the new suspension.

  6. #86
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    Re: The next race bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian P View Post

    The CFM rearsets provide only limited adjustment, but based on a test-sit, they are where they need to be. I may have to raise the seat up a bit for legroom, at the moment I'm thinking to just use longer bolts for the seat and shove washers underneath where the seat bolts down.

    I'm pretty sure I recall seeing Graves Junior cup bikes with raised seat pans. I think it was part of their bodywork package, not sure on who was the manufacturer though

  7. #87
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    Re: The next race bike

    I started the shift detent spring job and ended up finishing it. The new spring looks the same but the wire is about 10% thicker. It can be reached with needlenose pliers without taking the clutch apart. Getting the clutch cover back on...was extremely annoying.

  8. #88
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    Re: The next race bike

    hey brian, are you keeping the exhaust system stock? looking at some dyno graphs (spears) it seems a full exhaust doesn't add any significant hp over stock. thoughts?
    Last edited by boyoboy; 10-08-2018 at 11:20 AM.
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  9. #89
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    Re: The next race bike

    Full Hindle was the first thing to go on the bike. If nothing else, the stock exhaust system is heavy.

    Shock is in. Reading instructions for the fork cartridge kits now. There are a couple of special tools that will have to be improvised.

    The number of things that need doing before the bike is ready for some dyno runs and basic set-up is dwindling. I want to get the forks put together (last big job), the correct handlebars should arrive later this week, and the quickshift sensor is on order.
    Last edited by Brian P; 10-08-2018 at 12:55 PM.

  10. #90
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    Re: The next race bike

    I needed something therapeutic to do today ... Fork cartridges are in. They are a pretty ingenious design - they attach at the bottom same place the damping rod does, and at the top replacing the fork cap. Left fork does compression damping and right one does rebound; the inner workings are evidently the same but with the pistons flipped over inside. I've read and seen horror stories about other fork cartridge installations, having to completely dismantle the forks and grind a lip off the bottom of the inner tube to get the "oil lock" off ... these simply re-use the oil lock so it all stays in place and you don't even have to separate the inner and outer fork tubes.

    Special tool? not needed. An 8mm wrench will do to hold the fork spring down and the inner rod up. Just do the assembly with the fork inclined enough so that the inner rod doesn't fall back down. The spring is easy to compress by hand.

    I have my doubts that the Ohlins recommended spring rates will be stiff enough. Bike plus rider are lighter than my 400 and lighter than a modern 600 but not *that* much lighter. A common spring rate in a 600 is around 0.95 kg/mm. Bike plus rider here will be about 10% - 15% lighter so I would take a guess at 0.80 - 0.85 kg/mm; Ohlins went by the chart in the installation manual for the cartridges which gives 0.75 kg/mm. They are together with those springs ... I will give it a go with those first.

  11. #91
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    Re: The next race bike

    The Ohlins fork cartridges sound almost too good to be true. I guess the flipside is that they aren't cheap?
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  12. #92

    Re: The next race bike

    I used the Ktech ones in my R3 and it was the same thing. Easy drop in. Compression on the left rebound on the right. The Ktech rear spring was way too stiff as delivered so we had to take most of the preload out even for the 250lb rider.
    Quote Originally Posted by TwistedKestrel View Post
    The Ohlins fork cartridges sound almost too good to be true. I guess the flipside is that they aren't cheap?
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  13. #93
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    Re: The next race bike

    Quote Originally Posted by TwistedKestrel View Post
    The Ohlins fork cartridges sound almost too good to be true. I guess the flipside is that they aren't cheap?
    I've had 23 years (actually more, if you count my original race bike) of riding around on damper rod forks. They had the usual tweaks but there's still only so much that can be done.

    Everyone competitive in this class at CSBK that I can tell, is using either Ohlins or Ktech cartridges. I won't be riding at CSBK (too olde, black numbers) but I'd still like something that functions properly.

    It costs what it costs.

  14. #94

    Re: The next race bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian P View Post
    I've had 23 years (actually more, if you count my original race bike) of riding around on damper rod forks. They had the usual tweaks but there's still only so much that can be done.

    Everyone competitive in this class at CSBK that I can tell, is using either Ohlins or Ktech cartridges. I won't be riding at CSBK (too olde, black numbers) but I'd still like something that functions properly.

    It costs what it costs.
    I raced at three of the 5 CSBK weekends in the support class races which were lightweight classes. St Eustache was the only round that had no support races and I was unable to attend Mosport. So even as an old pro I got to ride the R3 a lot this summer. Shannonville, Grand Bend and Shubenacadie CSBK rounds plus 4 classes at each of the 5 RACE weekends. Aaron and I shared the bike at Shubenacadie. He did CSBK and I did the support classes.

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    Last edited by TSC_113; 10-10-2018 at 09:46 AM.
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  15. #95
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    Re: The next race bike

    Yeah there will be options ...

    Quickshifter switch showed up. Looks like dual contact is the way they are now. Found a shorter shift rod to match up with it, installed it, routed the cable, and now discovered that I don't have a screwdriver small enough to get into those screws at the PowerCommander terminals, so that will be tomorrow's little job.

    A minor nuisance is that with the switch in place and with these rearsets installed for GP shift (i.e. knuckle flipped over), the knuckle needs to come off to get the sprocket cover off ... but the switch hits the inside of the shift pedal before the knuckle will actually clear the shift shaft, so you have to loosen the rearset bolts a couple of turns to let the whole rearset assembly swing loose a bit to get enough clearance. If this turns out to be a nuisance (if the front sprocket has to be frequently changed) I'll trim the (plastic) sprocket cover. I may do that anyhow "just because".

    The bare bike is close to being operational, if perhaps not tuned and set up. Handlebars (first thing ordered, last thing to be received, still don't have the correct ones), front brake line (can't do that until I have the controls where I want them), homemade bracket for the air/fuel gauge, and that should result in a functional bare bike ready for set-up and tuning.

    It will still need: safety wiring, bodywork installation, tires (depends on what's available for next year), chain and sprockets.

  16. #96
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    Re: The next race bike

    nice suspension, like.
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  17. #97

    Re: The next race bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian P View Post
    Yeah there will be options ...

    Quickshifter switch showed up. Looks like dual contact is the way they are now. Found a shorter shift rod to match up with it, installed it, routed the cable, and now discovered that I don't have a screwdriver small enough to get into those screws at the PowerCommander terminals, so that will be tomorrow's little job.

    A minor nuisance is that with the switch in place and with these rearsets installed for GP shift (i.e. knuckle flipped over), the knuckle needs to come off to get the sprocket cover off ... but the switch hits the inside of the shift pedal before the knuckle will actually clear the shift shaft, so you have to loosen the rearset bolts a couple of turns to let the whole rearset assembly swing loose a bit to get enough clearance. If this turns out to be a nuisance (if the front sprocket has to be frequently changed) I'll trim the (plastic) sprocket cover. I may do that anyhow "just because".

    The bare bike is close to being operational, if perhaps not tuned and set up. Handlebars (first thing ordered, last thing to be received, still don't have the correct ones), front brake line (can't do that until I have the controls where I want them), homemade bracket for the air/fuel gauge, and that should result in a functional bare bike ready for set-up and tuning.

    It will still need: safety wiring, bodywork installation, tires (depends on what's available for next year), chain and sprockets.
    We just left the sprocket cover off.

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  18. #98
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    Re: The next race bike

    That's another option. I might also fab up a chain guide to replace it. One thing I've noticed ... if you ever break a chain, there is absolutely nothing to stop the loose end of it from whacking through the engine cases. My fizzer has a little metal guard there that closely follows the outside of the chain (with the stock sprocket) the idea being to guide that loose end of the chain around the countershaft sprocket that one last time ... I've broken a chain on the fizzer and nothing happened to the engine.

  19. #99
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    Re: The next race bike

    Today: Got a little screwdriver to connect the quickshifter wires to the PowerCommander, did that, installed the weatherproofing plugs on the PC, tidied up wiring and ziptied it in place, set the front suspension to Ohlins recommendations as a starting point, found a piece of metal to use as a prototype bracket for the air/fuel gauge but didn't actually start that project. At this point, the project bike is starting to look neat and tidy, and the workshop is looking like a disaster, so cleaning up the shop, at least to the point where I can see the top of the workbench, is next up. Then there is going to be about a week of no progress, because of other commitments. And I'm still waiting for handlebars ...

    Evidently Woodcraft is resistant to filling the order for the handlebars that I want because "they will move the bars forward". Yeah, that's the point! With what else has been done, there is a ton of clearance.

  20. #100

    Re: The next race bike

    Should have held out for the '19.

    God its beautiful!

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