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Thread: Not just motorcycle riders are in danger of cagers / idiots

  1. #41

    Re: Not just motorcycle riders are in danger of cagers / idiots

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    The problem is in the west, they have successfully removed one of the most important fears....as the doctor from Batman said "The fear of death"

    We've sterilized our society so much, and this is the side effect.

    If a pedestrian in another part of the world walks across the street with impunity, he simply because roadkill. Enough of that happens and people learn.

    That fear sort of keeps people in check. A lot more ********** in canada, because they know they can get away with it.

    They wouldn't last a week in Columbia, or mexico.

  2. #42
    Baggsy's Avatar
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    Re: Not just motorcycle riders are in danger of cagers / idiots

    Quote Originally Posted by fastar1 View Post
    Here's another one for you to add to your list of "I've never seen a study contrary to that, that I chose to believe". Of course it's a government stat so probably a lie. Especially since it's federal government and you hate Trudeau. Because that's how stats work. https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/motorvehicl...5-1201.htm#s38 33% of fatally injured pedestrians were at-fault for the crash Again, the big variable is how accurately police assign blame. Here's two instances where they were quick to jump to the defense of drivers and turned out to be wrong: https://www.thestar.com/news/crime/2...om-samson.html And in this one they looked at the video, which clearly shows vehicular assault, and figured they needed to find out what happened beforehand to see if it was justified! https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/0..._11654810.html War on the car, my ***!
    From your first article:
    "Pedestrians: Some of the characteristics of pedestrian traffic fatalities are as follows:

    • 75% of pedestrian traffic fatalities occurred on urban roads;
    • 60% of pedestrians killed in traffic crashes were trying to cross the road;
    • 35% of fatally injured pedestrians were aged 65 or older even though they represent only 13% of the population;
    • 63% of pedestrians killed at intersections were 65 or older;
    • 6% of fatally injured pedestrians were under the age of 16 and of these, 20% ran out into the street;
    • 33% of fatally injured pedestrians were at-fault for the crash;
    • 33% of fatally injured pedestrians were struck by a driver who had committed a traffic infraction prior to the crash;
    • 60% of pedestrians were killed at night or during dim light conditions when they are not seen by drivers;
    • 40% of fatally injured pedestrians had been drinking.

    Pedestrians should not assume that drivers see them at intersections and should instead make eye contact with drivers to ensure that they have been seen and that the driver is going to wait until they cross. Young pedestrians 5 to 10 years of age could receive training either at home or at school about how to walk to and from school safely. Seniors could take courses about being safe in traffic. People walking at night should wear light coloured reflective clothing so they can be seen by drivers. Given the high incidence of pedestrians being killed after drinking, bar employees could encourage impaired patrons to take a taxi rather than drive or walk. "

    You're left to fill in the blanks by yourself.

    While it says "an evidence-based Best Practice Framework will be adopted in choosing interventions; a fluid and flexible approach will allow jurisdictions to adopt best practices appropriate to their situation; and jurisdictions will own their road safety plans".

    It seems that special "non evidence-based" emphasis may have been placed on some criteria, and not others, or perhaps people are just reading what they want to see into the report.

    I found this bit interesting: "Collision statistics reveal that 27% of fatalities and 19% of serious injuries involve speeding."

    Does that mean that 73% of fatalities and 81% of serious injuries do not involve speeding?

    We need the missing numbers in order to make informed choices.
    Last edited by Baggsy; 07-04-2018 at 11:52 AM.
    Ignorance is curable, Apathy not so much, but I don't care, I'll try anyway.

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  3. #43

    Re: Not just motorcycle riders are in danger of cagers / idiots

    Quote Originally Posted by bigpoppa View Post
    The problem is in the west, they have successfully removed one of the most important fears....as the doctor from Batman said "The fear of death"

    We've sterilized our society so much, and this is the side effect.

    If a pedestrian in another part of the world walks across the street with impunity, he simply because roadkill. Enough of that happens and people learn.

    That fear sort of keeps people in check. A lot more ********** in canada, because they know they can get away with it.

    They wouldn't last a week in Columbia, or mexico.
    I'm afraid on Spadina some cars is going to run me over. I got doored a few times and had a bunch of near misses even though I am on the right on a marked bicycle lane, with daylight visible flashing lights and high viz backpack. Problem solved? WTF.

  4. #44
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    Re: Not just motorcycle riders are in danger of cagers / idiots

    So I walked out of the grocery store the other day and a younger guy (say early 20's) was in front of me just as we approach the roadway to cross to where the cars are parked. There are painted lines where we were about to cross. He just steps right onto the road without looking and an SUV just about brushed him as it went by.

    I made a comment to the effect "geez, they'll run you over". He then said, "yeah but then I'd be rich" at which point I then said "or dead". He kinda shrugged his shoulders.

    It made me think back to 5 or 6 years ago when you'd see those videos of people in Russia purposely walking in front of cars or buses to get an insurance pay-off. I recall at that time thinking how long it'd be before we saw that here.

    We're there now folks! Pedestrians are looking for a huge pay-off and risking their lives to do it! And that's the truth, not 100% of the time, but up there.
    2014 Moto Guzzi California Custom

  5. #45

    Re: Not just motorcycle riders are in danger of cagers / idiots

    Quote Originally Posted by bigpoppa View Post
    The problem is in the west, they have successfully removed one of the most important fears....as the doctor from Batman said "The fear of death"

    We've sterilized our society so much, and this is the side effect.

    If a pedestrian in another part of the world walks across the street with impunity, he simply because roadkill. Enough of that happens and people learn.

    That fear sort of keeps people in check. A lot more ********** in canada, because they know they can get away with it.

    They wouldn't last a week in Columbia, or mexico.
    It's hilarious that you should mention those two countries as examples.

    In Columbia, Medellin has been a model for urban development around the world. http://cities-today.com/medellin-wins-world-city-prize/

    The city took steps in the 2000s to redevelop itself around sound urban planning principles, and it has paid off massively in terms of economic growth and safety. Transportation solutions focused on improving the pedestrian realm, adding gondolas and even whole networks of escalators in hillside neighbourhoods. https://www.planetizen.com/node/68318. There's not much to fear walking around urban Columbia these days.

    As for Mexico, they're on the path to resolving their own problems the same way in Mexico City. https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/sto...f-mexico-city/

    There's nothing to be afraid of there any more than in Toronto. As I said earlier (or in another thread?) pedestrian and cyclist injuries and deaths have been declining gradually here, if you look at the long term trend. And that's even before you factor in the growing population. The hysteria about vulnerable road users is just a symptom of the times we live in, where 'better' is never good enough any more.

    But continued improvement won't come by ignoring the problem, and whatever action is taken to reduce deaths and injuries will sometimes come at the expense of drivers. There's no way around that but there's no need to be hysterical about that either. Sound urban planning principles show us that we will all be better off in the end. Besides, no one has ever proposed a future that didn't include cars as an essential ingredient of the transportation mix. If you ask me, cars will continue to be widely relied upon, even in urban centres, until affordable teleportation is invented.
    The odd times I felt I'd approached the truth, it rested on the premise that people are essentially good and smart.

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