What's with the leg thing? - Page 2



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Thread: What's with the leg thing?

  1. #21

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    Re: What's with the leg thing?

    i remember 3 reasons for this action.1st to get the riders weight as low as possible (standing on the inside peg) . the 2nd a way for the rider to gauge the angle of the lean. 3rd bike doesn't have to lean as much. allowing the rider to go faster.
    i always thought it was the 1st more than anything .i hope theres a speed demon on this board that can confirm the myths from the facts.

  2. #22

    Re: What's with the leg thing?

    Nobody can say for sure, but your 3 reasons don't make sense.

    For the first one I assume you meant 'standing on the outside peg', since the inside leg is dangling. Regardless, it just doesn't add up in terms of physics. Your weight is in your body, it doesn't change location unless your body moves. Putting more load through one arm or another, or one leg or another, doesn't move your body it just tenses different muscles. Putting more load on a different part of the bike may affect the bike's reaction to other forces but it doesn't do a thing to lower your weight on the bike.

    The second might make sense if the rider were dragging a foot across he ground, but usually they just dangle it. They also don't particularly care what angle they're leaning, that's not something they typically want to spend any of their attention on trying to figure out. It's not useful information for getting around the corner quickly.

    The third doesn't make sense because outside supermoto they never hang their leg out through the corner. Even in supermoto it's hard to see how a leg straight out as low as possible could be lower than a knee down with the feet on the pegs.

    I never heard an explanation that made sense until I read this;
    Quote Originally Posted by jcbarnar View Post
    According to Simon Crafar it's to help balance the bike while trail braking because the chasis wants to pivot around the headstock to the outside when the rear end gets light. Often times the rear wheel is off the ground if you google it which supports this theory
    So the inside leg sticking out as far as possible may add weight to the inside to counteract the force pushing the bike to the outside going into a turn. Maybe someone will test that theory somehow, but likely it will always remain conjecture.
    Last edited by fastar1; 06-26-2017 at 06:26 PM.
    The odd times I felt I'd approached the truth, it rested on the premise that people are essentially good and smart.

  3. #23
    Riceburner's Avatar
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    Re: What's with the leg thing?

    IIRC, Rossi stated that the telemetry didn't show any difference if he did it or not, but it felt right to do it. I don't run 200 km/h in a turn, so can't say.

  4. #24

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    Re: What's with the leg thing?

    Why drag knee?

    MZ Scorpion racebike in turn 2 at NHMS (Loudon), 2005.
    www.owensracingphotos.com

    It is true that one reason people drag their knees in corners is to say they can and to have the photos and scuffed knee pucks as evidence of their awesomeness. But, the real reason why knee dragging exists is to provide a lean angle gauge. If your body position is consistent from corner to corner, all day long, then you can reliably use your knee as a measuring device. Here are the various things you can measure:

    • How far over you’re leaned…sort of like a lean angle protractor.
    • As a quick-turn gauge: When you touch your knee can measure how quickly you are initiating lean.
    • Your corner speed: How long your knee remains on the ground measures your corner speed and the duration of your established lean angle.
    • How early you are “picking the bike up” as you exit the corner. This can also indicate how early and hard you are getting on the gas.
    • As a learning tool to become faster and more consistent. If you touch down earlier, this indicates that you are getting your bike turned quicker.
    • As a reference point measuring device. After you have a track dialed in, when and where your knee touches down should be consistent from lap to lap.

    Another use for having your knee on the deck is to save a crash if your motorcycle starts to slide. I’ve rarely ever used this tool to save a sliding bike, but having a third point of contact can relieve the overtaxed tires enough to save you from a crash. It doesn’t always work, but it is certainly worth a shot.

  5. #25
    kellen's Avatar
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    Re: What's with the leg thing?

    I saved a front end slide once with a knee. It's like way down the list. I rarely drag a knee.

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  6. #26
    dricked's Avatar
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    Re: What's with the leg thing?

    I think the leg dangle has been adapted to road racing after so many riders have been training flat track. Once you start sliding the bike with your leg out it becomes second nature.

    As for dragging knee, I don't know if my knee has touched more than 10 times this entire season. I know I'm leaned over by the feel of the bike and how it's sliding and moving under me. My suit will wear out before my knee sliders.

  7. #27
    Neil_V's Avatar
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    Re: What's with the leg thing?

    Came up on a street rossi with my Buell a few years back; had to roll out of it big time to keep from running into his backside while he made all kinds of weird shapes trying to keep his knee on the ground.
    2013 Aprilia RSV4 R APRC

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