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Thread: New to Sport bikes and this site

  1. #21

    Re: New to Sport bikes and this site

    Quote Originally Posted by boyoboy View Post
    I would think there are some skills transferable from racing a bike downhill. Do downhill bikes have a front brake? I imagine racing down hill would require some good brake control skills, likewise reading lines and looking where you want to go. Also sliding, with or without the rear brake. Skills may not be a perfect fit for street riding, but they would be helpful. The OP has mentioned riding his friends motorcycle, so for a friend to offer up his bike, one would have to think the OP has some abilities like knowing how to shift. A MSF/NSF? street riding course is sound advice.
    you are right, there is more that's transferable, specifically as you mentioned viewing your lines and object avoidance

    although what you do to setup, and how to react are quite different

    I imagine if you're rolling down hill by force of gravity, although there likely is a front brake,
    you're not gonna want to grab a handful of it, the rear brake would be in constant use for
    controlling speed and direction, that braking habit and the sliding you mentioned are behaviors
    that would make for some perilous riding on hardtop and would need to be un-learned
    Last edited by JavaFan; 03-21-2017 at 06:23 PM.

  2. #22
    Ethereal's Avatar
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    Re: New to Sport bikes and this site

    My issue with breaking and knowing when to break are not the real issue. The real problem with all my experience it the reversal of the front break and the clutch. That being said I have not found it an issue on my buddy's bikes. I am signed up for a coarse in April and plan to do more. As for breaks in constant use, racing you are on the breaks or off them. Trail breaking is counter productive in cycling 95% of the time. If you drag your breaks you waste the momentum you worked hard to build up. You need to find your breaking points and commit to them. Once in the turn you need to be off your breaks to give all you can to the turn, applying front at this point would put to much on the front causing it to slide. This is not a bad thing if the corner is banked but in a flat turn or reverse camber turn it will end your run. In DH you only get one run and you have to make it count 100%. I also grew up on a farm with dirt bikes and such and the breaking was never an issue. But I never had a car pull out while doing 80km/h so I cant say how I would react but muscles do have memory and they know left hand as front break more then right. Really appreciate the feed back. Please do not take any of this as me saying I know what I am doing. Was hit head on while on a training ride in 2005 and went under the car. Lucky to still be here and all my skills did nothing to help me avoid it so I fully get what you guys are saying.

  3. #23

    Re: New to Sport bikes and this site

    sounds like you have the right approach, thinking and asking questions, you'll be fine

    and don't sweat the lever changes, first few times you pull in the clutch to slow down,
    then realize you're not slowing down, it will become intuitive to not do that again

    the course will give you best ways to deal with emergency situations

    best advice from an old guy: counter steer is real, and your tires will do better than you think they will

  4. #24
    boyoboy's Avatar
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    Re: New to Sport bikes and this site

    [QUOTE=JavaFan;2484160]

    although what you do to setup, and how to react are quite different

    I imagine if you're rolling down hill by force of gravity, although there likely is a front brake,
    you're not gonna want to grab a handful of it, the rear brake would be in constant use for
    controlling speed and direction, that braking habit and the sliding you mentioned are behaviors
    that would make for some perilous riding on hardtop and would need to be un-learned

    lmao, hope he doesn't brake slide around corners
    Last edited by boyoboy; 03-22-2017 at 06:45 PM.
    DEMOCRACY - NOT PLUTOCRACY www.globalresearch.ca

  5. #25

    Re: New to Sport bikes and this site

    lmao, hope he doesn't brake slide around corners



    if he can get that worked out, and then a power drift past the apex he'd be the man

  6. #26
    nakkers's Avatar
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    New to Sport bikes and this site

    Don't under estimate the experience of cycling in general and how it transfers to motorcycling.

    It certainly isn't going to make a new rider an amazing rider but, I'd say it does help.

    There are some things that need to be unlearned and also a lot that needs to be learned.

    Personally, one benefit I've experienced on a motorcycle, not to panic when a wheel breaks loose from acceleration or braking. Or when a road surface changes. A lot of new riders stiffen up or freeze.

    In my opinion, the op needs to learn how to ride slow. Manage the weight of a motorcycle, develop a feel for clutch engagement/disengagement, steering input etc. A bicycle is much more forgiving.



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