Copy of the M Test (M2X) checklist!



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Thread: Copy of the M Test (M2X) checklist!

  1. #1

    Copy of the M Test (M2X) checklist!

    Forum Sponsor
    Personal and examiner information has been removed but here is a copy of the M exit (license for full M) checklist that they use when doing you road test. The line items are everything they look for with a mark for each failure. 26 marks or a critical error will get you failed.

    Someone feel free to host these files since my host may limit it's access eventually.

    Enjoy and post if this should be stickied.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0m...c4UDJBRFk/view

    or

    http://www.passthewheel.com/practice...-checklist.asp
    Last edited by Car2Slo; 05-09-2016 at 09:35 PM. Reason: Refresh links, thx Blackfin & Baggsy
    Current - '02 Suzuki Hayabusa-T
    Current - '12 Motorino XPd

    Ex' - '00 Ducati 748
    Ex' - '08 T-rex (traded for Denali)
    Ex' - '72 Honda CL350
    Ex' - '88 - Yamaha YSR 80
    Ex' - '01 - Suzuki Gixxer 1000
    Ex' - '89 - Honda CB-1
    Ex' - '02 Yamaha R6
    Ex' - '91 Yamaha YSR 80
    Ex' - '98 Suzuki GSXR 600

  2. #2
    2wheelsgone
    Guest
    wow nice to have someone go out of there way to post this
    much appriciated.

  3. #3
    egypt_rider
    Guest
    i vote sticky

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Vaughan
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by egypt_rider
    i vote sticky
    me too, go to school...

  5. #5
    If you want this to be a sticky send a link in a PM to the mods/admins.

  6. #6
    Thanks NinjaNikki.

    Other usefull information.

    - Road test takes about 35-45 minutes.
    - You wear a headset and examiner follows behind you giving directions.
    - Road test consists of the following driving conditions;
    1. Residential / Industrial road (watch for schools, trucks, driveways)
    2. Riding on regular road with left, right, intersections.
    3. Highway ride with merging, exiting and passing.
    4. 1-2 emergency stopping procedures (pulling over to the side of the road and getting off bike)

    - Stuff to remember if you're doing the test. All of these identified in above test checklist.
    1. Head movement is critical and you need to do traffic checks constantly.
    2. Watch bike position and keep in correct blocking position. Also position your bike correctly for left, right turns (differs slightly on single lane and multiple lanes with designated turning lanes)
    3. Must use rear brake.
    4. Brake light must remain lit when stopped.
    5. During stopping left foot should come down, must be solid and not lifted/bounced when stopping, or dragged when starting. (bike always in gear)
    Current - '02 Suzuki Hayabusa-T
    Current - '12 Motorino XPd

    Ex' - '00 Ducati 748
    Ex' - '08 T-rex (traded for Denali)
    Ex' - '72 Honda CL350
    Ex' - '88 - Yamaha YSR 80
    Ex' - '01 - Suzuki Gixxer 1000
    Ex' - '89 - Honda CB-1
    Ex' - '02 Yamaha R6
    Ex' - '91 Yamaha YSR 80
    Ex' - '98 Suzuki GSXR 600

  7. #7
    RRRRRRRR
    Guest
    Thanks for the info

  8. #8
    thm655321
    Guest
    Although knowing the checklist will be helpful, it is not the be all and end all to enable you to pass. Take an accredited M2 exit course. Yes it costs money, but you will learn a lot and you are almost guaranteed to pass based on their teachings. Just MHO.

    THM

  9. #9
    CodeBlue
    Guest
    They are also very very picky about your speed when merging on the highway. Before merging you should be up to the speed limit... but if there are cars in the merging lane they say you should wait to move? (if the lane is ending I think this is even more dangerous).

    You should never make a lane change even if the car behind you is 25 car lengths away. This is because on the test you are doing the speed limit of 100km/hr... but on most highways EVERYONE is going faster so you can't lane change in front of anyone if you will cause them to break/slow down it is considered unsafe. Go figure.

    The 2 other riders I talked to and did their test that day had their G licence for 10 or more years including myself and we all thought our lane changes/speed were fine...but regardless you have to do what they expect on the test.

  10. #10
    hamiltongixxer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    '03 GSXR 750
    Posts
    5
    ok... i gotta question then.. i have to take this test in the next year or so..

    my question is.. if you are on a multi-lane highway.. you merge on.. so if you are going just 100kmph you should stay in the slow lane... but in the M1 exit course.. you are taught to use the fast lane for blocking position. IF you stay in the slow lane from the time you come onto the highway until you go off of the highway.. what is the "correct" blocking position for that slow lane?
    thanx in advance

  11. #11
    Actually you may of misunderstood blocking position for multi-lane highways.

    The suggestion is to use either the far left or right lanes to drive in. The middle lanes or lanes with traffic on both sides do not have a blocking position and should not be driven in.

    While driving on the right lane you should remain in the normal blocking position which is the left track. Use the middle lane to pass if you need to.
    Current - '02 Suzuki Hayabusa-T
    Current - '12 Motorino XPd

    Ex' - '00 Ducati 748
    Ex' - '08 T-rex (traded for Denali)
    Ex' - '72 Honda CL350
    Ex' - '88 - Yamaha YSR 80
    Ex' - '01 - Suzuki Gixxer 1000
    Ex' - '89 - Honda CB-1
    Ex' - '02 Yamaha R6
    Ex' - '91 Yamaha YSR 80
    Ex' - '98 Suzuki GSXR 600

  12. #12
    CodeBlue
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Car2Slo
    Actually you may of misunderstood blocking position for multi-lane highways.

    The suggestion is to use either the far left or right lanes to drive in. The middle lanes or lanes with traffic on both sides do not have a blocking position and should not be driven in.

    While driving on the right lane you should remain in the normal blocking position which is the left track. Use the middle lane to pass if you need to.
    While this is completely true, while you are doing your test they must ask you to make a lane change from the most far right lane into one of the middle lanes "when it's safe". Since it's not really ever safe to do this especially when you are only doing the speed limit I recommend that you don't do any lane changes and simply ride along until the examiner asks you to exit the freeway. If they ask why you didn't make a lane change you simply tell him it was not safe. They'll have no choice but to pass you. Unless you do your test when their are absolutely no cars on the highway in which case you can change lanes properly.

  13. #13
    When it comes to "not safe" is that your call or theirs? is it a bad point to not pass? As well, if you do pass through the middle lane, which tire track do THEY consider the correct one? TO me, it would be right side, most visible to the cars I am passing.
    CHOWDAH RIDAH

    2013 Hyperstrada
    1996 VFR750 -41,000mi
    2007 ZX-14 -104,362km (sold)
    2006 BW'S -9,000km (sold)
    2005 ZX636R -63,533km (stolen)
    2004 SV650S -30,000km (sold)
    2003 ZZR250 -15,000km (sold)

    Current tire choice: Pirelli Scorpion Trail
    Last tire choice: Pirelli Angel (fantastic stickynes and mileage. Best recommendation)
    CSC Certified Riding Instructor

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by suprPHREAK
    As well, if you do pass through the middle lane, which tire track do THEY consider the correct one? TO me, it would be right side, most visible to the cars I am passing.
    I asked the same question to my instructor and they said either left or right track is fine. I stayed in the right track during passing as this requires least amount of effort.
    Current - '02 Suzuki Hayabusa-T
    Current - '12 Motorino XPd

    Ex' - '00 Ducati 748
    Ex' - '08 T-rex (traded for Denali)
    Ex' - '72 Honda CL350
    Ex' - '88 - Yamaha YSR 80
    Ex' - '01 - Suzuki Gixxer 1000
    Ex' - '89 - Honda CB-1
    Ex' - '02 Yamaha R6
    Ex' - '91 Yamaha YSR 80
    Ex' - '98 Suzuki GSXR 600

  15. #15
    CodeBlue
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by suprPHREAK
    When it comes to "not safe" is that your call or theirs? is it a bad point to not pass? As well, if you do pass through the middle lane, which tire track do THEY consider the correct one? TO me, it would be right side, most visible to the cars I am passing.
    It was their call, they said the lane change I did was unsafe. It was in Aurora and I've heard a lot about them being picky.

    I have had my licence for 10 years and driven out of the country and back - I know how to change lanes safely...but if the examiner wants to be find something they will.

    If there are any cars on the highway relatively near you at the time you are doing your test, even if they are 20 car lengths behind you think twice about changing lanes...even if the instructor seems nice as mine did you never know.

  16. #16
    Skyros
    Guest
    "Foot moves" while stopped.
    Anyone know what that ones about? What foot?

    Approaching an intersection.
    "no brake light".
    Maybe Im wrong here, but I dont arbitrarily put my breaks on when I have a green light. I usually slow down slightly or keep the same speed, but I dont brake. Thats a great way to piss off the people behind you and get rear ended.

    Everything else seems pretty straight forward though

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Skyros
    "Foot moves" while stopped.
    Anyone know what that ones about? What foot?

    Approaching an intersection.
    "no brake light".
    1. Foot moves: Refers to the foot coming down once you have braked for a intersection (i.e. red light) or a stop sign. Your foot should come down close to the stop and not move after it touches the ground. The examiner wants to see that you have come to a complete stop and the bike is not still rolling. Also you should have complete control of the bike stopped and not shift weight for balance.

    2. I think they want to see a brake light when your stopping not for a green light. The brake light should be steady while braking and once stopped should not flicker or flash on/off. They are again checking that you come to a complete stop and the bike is in gear. Rear brake light should always be on for stops for safety sakes so car behind you know you're stopped.
    Current - '02 Suzuki Hayabusa-T
    Current - '12 Motorino XPd

    Ex' - '00 Ducati 748
    Ex' - '08 T-rex (traded for Denali)
    Ex' - '72 Honda CL350
    Ex' - '88 - Yamaha YSR 80
    Ex' - '01 - Suzuki Gixxer 1000
    Ex' - '89 - Honda CB-1
    Ex' - '02 Yamaha R6
    Ex' - '91 Yamaha YSR 80
    Ex' - '98 Suzuki GSXR 600

  18. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    St. Kitts
    Posts
    463
    Quote Originally Posted by Car2Slo
    Rear brake should always be on for stops for safety sakes so car behind you know you're stopped.
    My front brake triggers the brake light as well...

    The M1 course I took preached stopping, left foot down, right foot down, shoulder checks, and keeping the front brake on...

    Most courses teach and test based on experience, not simply the written contents of a 30 year old publication.
    o~`o
    VSRI #1930
    The most common problem with motorcycles is the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

  19. #19
    Thanks Car2Slow!!!

    This post really helped me as I successfully passed my M in Aurora this morning. Knowing what they are looking for helped me prepare mentally. The tester was a nice guy and doing it in Aurora at 9am is relatively low traffic.

    My experience leads me to believe that you have to be a really bad rider (or have some incredibly bad luck) to fail this test if you know what they are looking for. Clearly there are a couple things that I do not regularly do that if I had gone into the test blind could have easily caused me to fail (stuff like not stopping a bike length from the car in front or touching the line at a stop or moving your foot when stopped or rolling forward at a red light etc...)

    btw I lost a mark for not keeping up to the flow of traffic on the highway (120km, I was doing 105-110) I also took the time to say beforehand that I dont ride in the middle lane and he made it a point to direct me to change to middle lane and back again when safe to do so.

    On a side note if anyone is interested I had no problems with my integrated signal lights but I did turned off the pulsating brake light.

  20. #20
    Hey - just figured I'd post my experiences as well. I did ask my tester about middle lane driving and he said he didn't care where i was, as long as i picked a track. also, he said "we're just looking for smart riding - don't tailgate, don't cut people off and just relax - you'll be fine"

    Things I lost marks for:
    - not checking left-right-left before entering an intersection (I did this sometimes but it's really hard to remember to do it EVERY time, esp when you're constantly shoulder and mirror checking)
    - when turning right from a stop, not checking over my right shoulder to ensure there aren't any cyclers/pedestrians/cars trying to sneak by (again, I only did this sometimes but it's hard to remember every time!)

    My highway riding was basically this: enter 401, told me to left lane change (I complied) and then another left lane change...finally, had to go back two more lanes to the right and then take the next off ramp - was over before it ever started

    I used the ZZR250 with integrated turn signals and they never said a word. For my roadside stop, I just signaled, pulled over and turned the handlebars (left) and before I could get my sidestand down, he said "ok, continue on".

    Anyways, best of luck to everyone! I took the M1 exit course @ Humber, and thought it was a great way to learn and highly recommend it, but didn't have the money or time for the M2 exit course - luckily I had no problems with the M2 exit test at the MTO.

    cheers,
    k
    Kristina
    "Sorry, you are not Canada's next star racer."

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